How the Eating Better Alliance will encourage men to eat less meat on The Drum’s Do It Day 2016

The Eating Better Alliance will oversee the launch of a new campaign at this year’s Do It Day, encouraging men to cut down on their meat consumption by coining the phrase ‘VegCurious’.

The group want men to eat less meat to better their health and the health of the planet. Eating meat has been perceived as being masculine for years, with advertising and marketing campaigns contributing to six out of 10 men exceeding the government intake of red and processed meat per week, as opposed to only one in four women. In 2015, Pepperami released research that claimed that men would rather give up sex, Sky Sports and their jobs, than give up meat.

Eating Better posed a meaty challenge; how can we encourage men to eat less meat? The winning idea turned what could be a nagging campaign about eating less meat into a fun message to chow down more vegetables, under the banner: “Are you VegCurious?”

It will be brought to life through social activation campaigns encouraging men to share their #VegCurious meals on social platforms, with the potential for celebrity chef endorsements, restaurant and brand interaction via the #VegCurious hashtag, with the potential for physical popups in stations, public places and supermarkets. The campaign will culminate in the VegCurious Awards intended to appeal to many brands men are loyal to.

Daniel Vennard, from the World Resources Institute which is working alongside Eating Better, said: “The idea disrupted the usual narrative, turning the serious to humour, from guilt to enablement, providing a very engaging and motivating campaign that will have an excellent legacy factor.”

Winning team: Marc Young, Dennis Publishing; Chris Aming, founder, Creative Semiotics; Ben Hawley, director, Theobald Fox; Christopher Onderstall, Fleishman; Inga Driksne, head of client relations, Duel

You can book your ticket for 10 November here.

Katie Deighton

Katie Deighton is The Drum’s senior reporter - creative and video based in London. She produces, films, presents and edits the title’s editorial video output, including series such as On The Scene, Ad Breakers and Why I Left Advertising, and manages its coverage of the creative sector. She also reports on the intersection between politics and marketing, as well as the third sector and fashion.

All by Katie