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Bill Nye and Bombay Sapphire explain the science of why gin and tonic tastes so damn good

You may not be anywhere near the office water cooler right now, but we still want to spotlight the most talked about creative and stunts that should be on your radar. Today, we’re relishing a refreshing new Bombay Sapphire partnership with Bill Nye.

In case you didn’t know, today is National Gin & Tonic Day. And what better way to celebrate than to get to the bottom of exactly what it is that makes the pairing so refreshing. That's why Bombay Sapphire tapped scientist and TV personality Bill Nye to create a series of videos offering scientific proof, as it launches its new ready-to-drink (RTD) Bombay Sapphire & Tonic canned products.

In three videos, Nye explores exactly why our taste buds love this classic, fizzy combo. According to Natasha Curtin, vice-president of global marketing at Bombay Sapphire, the videos explore “why the specific 10 botanicals used in the vapor-infusing production process of Bombay Sapphire pair so well with the flavor of premium tonic water.” The first installment will debut on Nye’s Instagram page today.

“Juniper berries are the basis of all gins,“ muses Nye in the video. “As you know, they release an oil consisting of cadinene, camphene, terpineol and alpha-pinene. This is what creates the tart, bright, herbaceous flavor we gin lovers love. The lemon peel creates a surprisingly melon-like flavor, cassia bark adds cinnamon notes, and grains of paradise are... grains. Of paradise. Who doesn’t want that in their drink?”

Nye became a cultural touchstone and beloved role model in the 1990s with Bill Nye the Science Guy. Known for making science fun and accessible, he has since starred in his own Netflix series. In the past year, Nye has grown increasingly popular as questions surrounding the authority of science dominate the media and shape the discourse on everything from climate change to how public officials should handle the pandemic. Those who grew up watching his show – now in their 20s and 30s – have flocked to TikTok and Instagram en masse (Nye has garnered some 7 million TikTok followers) to follow along as he breaks down the science behind space, cooking, the effectiveness of masks in preventing the spread of viruses and much more.

​“We knew that Bill Nye was a big fan of Bombay Sapphire and appreciated the bright, clean taste of our gin,” says Curtin. ”We thought that it would be interesting to invite him into our world to explore why the brand is such a hit.”

Noting an increase in demand for convenient RTD options, the Bombay Sapphire & Tonic canned product was launched in the UK in April. Today the product debuts in the US alongside a Bombay Sapphire & Light Tonic, a lower-calorie option. Curtin says the brand aims to “deliver a premium iteration of the classic gin and tonic and a bartender-quality serve that doesn’t sacrifice flavor for convenience.”

While Curtin admits Nye may be an “out-of-the-box choice” to promote a cocktail from the 19th century, she believes he will help Bombay “create brand affinity in an unexpected manner that piques curiosity and maybe evokes a bit of nostalgia for those who remember his show from the 90s.”

As for the future of Bombay Sapphire, Curtin says the gin giant has big plans underway. “We have some exciting launches in the works for 2021 that will continue to push the boundaries of flavor and convenience in the rapidly growing gin and RTD category.”

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