By Minda Smiley | Reporter

July 16, 2016 | 3 min read

Two super PACs have rolled out a series of ads that feature young women and men who refuse to repeat statements that Donald Trump has made over the years.

Created by New York agency SS+K, which also worked on a reelection campaign for President Obama in 2012, the ads will begin to run during the Republican National Convention, which begins on July 18. According to the agency, the campaign begins with a “$1.5 million investment in digital programming in nine key battleground states” and is aimed towards millennial women.

The groups behind the ads are Women Vote, a super PAC that is part of political action committee Emily's List, which is dedicated to putting pro-choice Democratic female candidates in office, and Priorities USA Action, a super PAC that is supporting Hillary Clinton this election. This campaign is the first in a series of digital ads that the two are rolling out as part of a $20m joint effort.

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The videos feature young people on the street who are hesitant to read the cards that have been handed to them, which say things like “putting a wife to work is a very dangerous thing” and “a person who is very flat-chested is very hard to be a 10.” Each ad ends with the message: “The president speaks for all of us. Don’t let Donald Trump speak for you. Be heard. Vote.”

Denise Feriozzi, Emily’s List deputy executive director, said of the ads: “Young people across the country could never imagine saying the derogatory, racist comments from Donald Trump, let alone having a president who says them. The values that millennial women stand for and the future that they want hang in the balance this election—but they also have the power to do something about it.”

This campaign is the latest in a string of ads attacking Trump, including one from Hillary Clinton that positions the Republican presidential candidate as a bad role model for children and another created by Goodby Silverstein & Partners co-founders Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein that mocks Trump’s antics.

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