Guinness relates the tale of Japan’s female rugby pioneers with ‘Made of More’ latest

Guinness is covering fresh ground in advertising with the release of an extended five minute documentary and associated commercial which communicates the tale of a Japanese women’s rugby team who came together against the odds pursue their passion for the sport.

Liberty Tales highlights how the group collectively overcame societal pressures in 1980’s Japan to pursue their passion, before ultimately representing their country at the Women’s Rugby World Cup – despite having no support to speak of and indeed facing outright hostility and ridicule.

Ms Kishida, of the Liberty Fields team, recalled: “It was back in the day, when getting harassed, sexually and otherwise was a given. Men expected women to be young, pretty and willing to quit their jobs for marriage. At the time, the women’s team weren’t recognised as official. So, we founded our organisation.

“We lose if women can’t play rugby. The reason why we’ve kept on going is because we don’t want to lose. I wanted society to accept that women can love this kind of sport too, not just men.”

Niall McKee, head of Guinness Stout Europe said: “We firmly believe at Guinness that when we stand together, we can take on the world. In a year where rugby takes centre stage thanks to the men’s team, we are using this pedestal to celebrate women in sport by showcasing the story of Ms Kishida and her Liberty Fields teammates – a team who are truly made of more. Our campaign around the story of Liberty Fields will see us talk more about inclusivity and diversity and celebrate women as pioneers.”

Part of the ‘Made of More’ series Liberty Tales forms part of a family of stories celebrating real people who became champions; including two sisters who ultimately ended up splitting their loyalties between the Scotland and England rugby teams and the story of the first openly gay professional rugby player.

This approach includes a six year partnership with the Women’s Six Nations.

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