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Emoji-inspired vibrators set out to close the ‘climax gap’

Terri & Sandy, an independent, female owned and operated advertising agency in New York, is launching the first campaign for Emojibator – a global company that sells vibrators inspired by emojis, specifically, the eggplant and red hot chili pepper.

The campaign advocates for women’s equality in a place lagging behind their male counterparts: the bedroom.

‘Let’s close the climax gap’, was penned after the agency discovered that women have 30% fewer orgasms than men, according to a study in the Archives of Sexual Behavior. In addition, men are able to talk more openly and candidly about masturbation while women report it as a hush-hush topic. Designed with women in mind, Emojibator products use humor to reach a new audience of sex toy consumers.

The work is anchored in two digital videos. The first, ‘Empowerment Feels Good’ puts a twist on the female empowerment genre, showing various women saying things like “reproductive rights are coming” and “equal pay is coming” before delivering the punchline at the end. The second video, ‘Men Don’t Know’ has men trying to describe how to give a woman an orgasm, with obvious male ignorance.

Terri Meyer and Sandy Greenberg, the founders of the agency, have spent their careers fighting to empower women in the advertising industry and beyond. So, when an art director on their team, Kyle Janisch, brought the Emojibator opportunity to their attention, they decided to take on a serious issue with humor. “If there’s a time to laugh it’s during International Masturbation Month,” says co-founder Sandy Greenberg, referring to the month of May, which has been designated as the month to celebrate self-love.

Emojibator co-founder and chief marketing officer, Kris Jandler, said: “After 19 years of ignorance, my college girlfriends jokingly gifted me a candy-cane vibrator and forever changed my confidence as a woman. Emojibator’s laughter-inducing brand is uniquely positioned to disrupt our orgasm-shaming culture, and, to educate women on their self-pleasure powers.”

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