Artists have recreated lost & stolen artwork using only Adobe stock photos and Photoshop

To show off the capabilities of its stock photo archive, Adobe has tapped four artists from around the world to re-create lost, stolen and destroyed artwork using only stock imagery and Photoshop.

The artwork is being featured in a campaign called ‘Make a Masterpiece’ that features each artist and the piece of art that they have recreated. Adobe found the artists through Behance, a creative platform where artists can share and discover work that the company bought in 2012.

At the ‘Make a Masterpiece’ website, viewers can check out each piece of recreated artwork along with the story behind the original and why it no longer exists today. The pieces of art featured include Frida Kahlo’s The Wounded Table, Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel, Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s Cathedral Towering Over a Town and Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee. On the site, time-lapse videos show how each artist utilized hundreds of Adobe Stock images to recreate these iconic masterpieces.

Created by Goodby Silverstein & Partners, the campaign also includes an online film featuring one of the artists involved in the project, Ankur Patar. In the behind-the-scenes video, he discusses how he recreated Rembrandt’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee and walks viewers through the steps he took to bring the painting to life again.

Will Elliott, associate partner and creative director at Goodby Silverstein & Partners, said of the campaign: “No one can truly replace these lost paintings. But by faithfully re-creating them with Adobe Stock, we can remember them again and reshape what the world thinks about stock photography in the process.”

According to the agency, the ‘Make a Masterpiece’ site will continue to grow and include even more re-created pieces of art down the line.

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