Spectre launch elevates estimated value of ‘brand Bond’ to £13bn

The latest cinematic instalment of the Bond franchise has raised the estimated total value of ‘brand Bond’ to a staggering £13bn, according analysts at the London School of Marketing.

In the wake of Spectre’s arrival on the big screen they calculated this figure based on box office sales of £9bn with the remaining £4bn split evenly between DVD sales and merchandising and co-marketing.

Skyfall became the highest grossing Bond flick ever after raking in £750m at the box office, exceeding classics of yesteryear such as Goldfinger and Thunderball which managed to take just £675m when adjusted for inflation – although their profitability was far higher as each film cost just £20 - £30m to produce.

This meant that films produced in the sixties and seventies could count on a 20-fold return on investment – versus a return of just four or five times today, although production costs are largely covered by between £80 and £150m ofproduct and brand tie-ins.

Faculty member of London School of Marketing, Jacques de Cock said: “Any brand linked to Bond is almost guaranteed a return on their investment, 14 brands have already associated themselves with Spectre, four of which – Heineken, Aston Martin, Omega, Tom Ford – also paid for association with Skyfall so must be happy with the return. This proves just how valuable that link with 007 is for these brands.

“For Skyfall, Heineken paid £28 million for product linkage. This is smaller but on the same scale as an Olympic event in terms of its both expense and reach.

“The Bond brand is one of the strongest out there. Could it be destroyed? Only if a high profile Bond bad-mouths it but without doubt the brand is bigger than the actors who play the title role, as its proved time and time again.

“However, the current enthusiasm for Spectre can only enhance the brand and make the marketing partners very happy.”

Daniel Craig has become the highest earning Bond actor picking up a £25m cheque for starring in Spectre but his total income is dwarfed by the first Bond, Sean Connery, who is thought to have made as much as £49m from Diamonds are Forever thanks to revenue and profit share arrangements.

Get The Drum Newsletter

Build your marketing knowledge by choosing from daily news bulletins or a weekly special.