Kellogg’s signs Tess Daly to fuel Special K's shift from diet-focused marketing

Kellogg's has signed TV presenter Tess Daly to front an overhaul of its Special K brand that sees it scrap its dieting slogans amid sliding sales and changes in consumer attitudes to health.

The cereal brand has charged forward with a multi-million pound refresh, which uses Daley as the face of Special K's new ‘Live in Colour’ campaign.

The push will encourage women to live a life of variety and choice rather than one of diet and deprivation, a stance it previously took with its 'Special K Challenge' that asked women to replace breakfast and lunch with bowls of the cereal to lose weight.

To address the changing way consumers think about ingredients, Special K's cereal products will now include the trademarked ‘Nutri K’ flake, which is fortified with nine vitamins and minerals and is ten per cent lower in sugar.

The ad is also a step away from the brand's long standing model in a red swimsuit and will see Daly (the first celebrity ambassador) wear an edible dress constructed by designer Petra Storr.

Special K brand communications manager Louise Thompson-Davies said: “Tess was our number one choice to be the first ever Special K ambassador and we were thrilled when she agreed to work with us. This is an exciting new beginning for Special K – we want to encourage women to live in colour and Tess embodies that spirit perfectly.”

Above the line activity kicked off last week with outdoor ads and radio voiceovers, while a TV push will follow in the coming months.

Speaking in February on an investor call as it released its Q1 2015 results, Kellogg's chief executive John Bryant said that Special K's problem was that it was "basically asking people to deprive themselves" with the challenge.

Special K was blamed for a 7.7 per cent drop in sales in Kellogg's US breakfast foods. In Europe and Northern Russia net sales fell by 13.8 per cent, also blamed on weakness in the cereal brand.

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