Save the Rhino asks the public to 'Help a Ranger, Save a Rhino' with 23red

Save the Rhino International (SRI) has engaged 23red to create two fundraising campaigns – ‘Help and Ranger, Save a Rhino’, the charity’s appeal of the year, and ‘Big 5, not Big 4’, a direct mail campaign targeting those who have recently returned from safari.

Designed to engage rhino enthusiasts, keen conservationists and animal lovers ‘Help a Ranger, Save a Rhino’ highlights the work of rangers in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa, and focuses on the individual items of kit needing replaced to help them protect rhinos with a call to action to donate toward specific items of kit, to show how donations make a difference.

A zoo toolkit, including posters, fundraising ideas and exercises to encourage partnering zoos and their visitors to help with the cause, features in the first element of the campaign with 23red developing a series of digital newsletters to help potential donators get to know a different ranger at Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park. A series of films will also run via social media over the coming months.

23red’s direct mail campaign for SRI – ‘Big 5, not Big 4’ – works with tour operators to target those who have recently been on a safari holiday and shows how one of the most popular animals in Africa may not be there for much longer. A lenticular postcard dramatizes the message showing rhinos disappearing from the African landscape.

Josephine Gibson, corporate relations manager at Save the Rhino International, said the campaign was “a great platform to reach out to those who are passionate about rhinos having witnessed them first-hand on their safari” and that it was “fantastic to have the support of the travel operators in helping us engage with and involve this important audience.”

Creative director and founding partner at 23red, Sean Kinmont, added: “Here at 23red we feel hugely passionate about this incredibly important cause. With both the ‘Help a Ranger, Save a Rhino’ appeal and ‘Big 5 not Big 4’ direct mail campaign, we look forward to giving the public the opportunity to take part in the vital mission to save the rhino.

“We also recognise that the future of wildlife is inextricably linked to the communities that share its habitat. By funding field projects and through education projects, the goal of SRI is not only to deliver benefits to the rhino but also to other endangered species, the eco systems, and people living in the local area.”

There are now just 29,000 rhinos in the wild today, falling from 500,000 at the beginning of the 20th century, in 2011 the Western black rhino was declared extinct by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) mainly due to poaching. All five remaining species of rhino are on the IUCN Redlist of threatened species.

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