YouGov poll finds that 51% of Londoners want city logo

A YouGov survey, commissioned by global brand consulting firm Landor Associates, has found that 51 per cent of Londoners are in favour of creating a logo for the city.

Some 31 per cent of the 1000 Londoners surveyed were against the idea of creating a logo for the capital, a concept which has risen from a discussion panel of London's 'creative leaders' also organised by Landor associates.

The panel concluded that London needs to manage its image more effectively and do more to capitalise on the good feeling resonating from the successful 2012 Olympics.

Peter Knapp, global creative officer at Landor Associates, who led the panel, called for more uniformity in the way London presents itself to international markets.

He said: “It is in our interest to make London the most attractive city we possibly can in order to draw investment, talent and tourists to the city. But, the impression I see is not of a coherent message, coherent policy or attitude towards London itself.

"Officially or unofficially, all major cities in the world have their own brand. Whether it’s Tokyo or San Francisco, New York or Barcelona, each will have certain commonly recognised associations. But is London managing those associations properly? Because if you leave it up to chance, the city could just as easily be defined by negative events like the London riots in 2011 or the financial crisis.”

Participants in the survey were also asked what image associated with London best represents the city, with traditional favourites scoring a convincing victory over some of London's newer landmarks.

Big Ben topped the poll proved most popular, winning 33 per cent of the vote, with Red London Buses coming in second on 16 per cent.

Tower Bridge (13 per cent) and the London Underground logo (12 per cent) also proved popular.

Modern landmarks proved less beloved with 1 per cent picking the Shard and no respondents picking the Gherkin or the Olympic Stadium.

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