Specsavers goes 'fresh and topical' with reactive news mockery in its first ever DOOH campaign

Specsavers' real-time DOOH campaign

Specsavers has rolled out a skewering digital out of home advertising campaign that makes light of the pointless news stories of the day in the hope that it will instead direct people towards regular sight tests.

The ‘More important' campaign debuted today (11 September) and ran with straplines like "More important than leaking phones” and “More important than post-match handshakes" alongside a call to action, driving viewers to the brand's website to register for a test.

And there's more to come, the high street optician said, depending on the next few weeks of news.

“This is a new direction for us and a renewed focus on being fresh and topical while focusing on a coherent campaign that delivers across all of the digital touchpoints," said Graham Daldry, creative director at Specsavers.

"By piggy-backing off the current news and gossip we can deliver a targeted and engaging campaign with local relevance to make sure our important message for maintaining eye health cuts through.”

The campaign has been managed by OpenLoop, with further support fromTalon Outdoor and Manning Gottlieb OMD across other mediums like print, digital, and social channels.

Dan Dawson, chief creative technology officer at Grand Visual, added: “This is digital OOH at its best. Reactive, targeted, relevant copy that is updated throughout the day. By harnessing the ‘context effect’ the media is working hard for the client delivering an important message in an intelligent way.”

The campaign will run across 12 UK cities It comes after the brand ran its Should've gone to mantra earlier this month in creative work underlining its free hearing tests.

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John McCarthy

John is an entertainment marketing reporter at The Drum. He writes about the amazing marketing stories coming from the movie, TV, music and video game industries. He's also the hunt for the weirder trends in marketing and advertising.

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