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Fabric hangs NFT artwork on Christmas tree in Australian mall

The Christmas NFTree in The Galeries encourages shoppers to purchase digital art

Fabric, the design and retail division of TBWA/Sydney, is showcasing the work of Australian non-fungible token (NFT) providers through the unlikely medium of a Christmas NFTree proudly displayed in a shopping mall.

Built from glass, mirrors and perspex plastic, the NFTree has been designed to maximize natural light with an unconventional display that marries the broad aesthetics of a traditional decorative tree with the emerging art form of NFTs to create a unique mash-up of culture and design fit for the digital age.

The sculptural piece invites shoppers to explore the work of eight NFT creators, inspiring them to become NFT art collectors by incorporating QR codes that connect to the profiles of creators Aldous Massie, Bianca Beers, David Porte Beckefeld, James Jirat Patradoon, Jonathan Puc, Lucius Ha, Rel Pham and Serwah Attafuah on Foundation.

NFT: Illuminated complements work undertaken by Fabric to provide bespoke signage and a new brand identity for The Galeries on behalf of Vicinity Centres.

Vicinity head of brand marketing and experience (premium) Corrine Barchanowicz said: “The Galeries has long been a destination for the contemporary and unique, and we wanted to extend that vision into Christmas by combining unique artwork with new technology. The new tree is distinctly The Galeries, introducing our customers to a new, cutting-edge experience never before seen in Australia.”

Fabric creative partner Keenan Motto added: “Our newly-developed platform for The Galeries intends to position [it] as the center loved for unconventional artistic exploration, with purpose.

“NFT is an exciting new space to play in, and we are lucky to have a brave client in Vicinity [that was] willing to explore a more contemporized expression of the season, which reimagines traditions for new audiences.”

The NFT craze has seen brands jostle for a slice of the digital art pie, despite concern that it is nothing more than a gimmick.

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