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The Chip Shop Awards postcards that could actually run as ads

A look at three postcards that could run as ads from this year's Chip Shop Awards Best Shop Window Postcards category.

After the success of this year’s Chip Show Awards – The Drum’s first hybrid event, which catered to both online and in-person viewing and saw over 2,000 people tune in – we take a look back at some of the entries of the Best Shop Window Postcards category and consider which of them could actually make it as real ads.

This category heralds cutting edge and risk-taking work, offering creatives the opportunity to showcase their ideas by creating something using only an A6 piece of card, a bit of Blu Tack and their imagination.

Taking inspiration from the noticeboards often found in newsagents, entries were then exhibited on the shopfront of The Drum’s new concept store, The Labs.

This year’s Chip winner was an ad from Ogilvy Health promoting a local glass etching class, which would be physically etched into the window. While this ad could theoretically run, it is unlikely a newsagent would want to permanently tarnish their window.

Here, however, are some of the entries that really could run...

‘Japanese Lesson’

Created by White Rabbit Budapest to promote Japanese language lessons, this piece of paper – which won the runner’s up Vinegar prize – playfully nods to Japanese culture, featuring a cutout that looks like the national flag with text vertically assembled to make it seem like it was written in a local style.

‘Narcolepsy Support Group’

Entered by Blab Digital, this window postcard advertises a support group for narcoleptics. Although the post is comedic, it is also eye catching and draws attention to the condition so that anybody reading this post could understand what the services offer.

‘New Home Wanted’

This postcard from Ogilvy Health works and could be used as an actual ad for the NSPCC. Despite its simplistic nature, it clearly suggests, signs of domestic violence such as the scrunched up paper, while maintaning the noticeboard aesthetic to blend in with other scrawled entries. It is apt for the brand and hints at the severity of the situation by capturing the home environment through a child‘s innocent eyes.

Check out the full list of results for this year‘s Best Shop Window Postcards.

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