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'Keep going': new UK Covid campaign urges public to remain home despite infection fall

You may not be anywhere near the office water cooler right now, but we still want to spotlight creative that should be on your radar. Today, we bring you the UK government's latest campaign urging the general public to 'keep going'.

A new UK government ad campaign is urging the public to 'keep going' and remain home as they continue to endure the latest lockdown.

The new push comes days after prime minister Boris Johnson set out the roadmap out of lockdown, amid falling infection rates and an ongoing vaccine rollout.

The government has stressed that for things to return to normal by 21 June, it will require the collective effort of citizens to adhere to the national guidelines.

And so, its latest appeal created by ad agency MullenLowe urges people to remain home until restrictions begin to be lifted, most likely on 29 March.

Launching on ITV tonight (24 February), 'Let's Keep Going' reinforces the stay-at-home message. "Every sacrifice, every day at home, every covered face, every wipe, every step aside, every 20-seconds, every friend unhugged, everything we're doing is helping stop the spread of Covid-19," says the voiceover, over footage of people going about their day under Covid restrictions. "Let's keep going," she concludes. Beyond TV, it will run across radio, advertising billboards and social media.

“Infection rates are falling, but they still remain very high and the impact of Covid-19 is still putting pressure on hospitals across the country,“ says Professor Chris Whitty, chief medical officer. “Vaccines give clear hope for the future, but for now we must all continue to play our part in protecting the NHS and saving lives.”

The latest coronavirus campaign follows the unsparing 'Look Into My Eyes' which was introduced in January. Taking a more emotive tone, it arrived at the heart of the most recent wave, where one person per 30-seconds was being admitted to hospital with the virus.

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