Read our new manifesto

Ikea offers ‘disassembly instructions’ to encourage customers to extend product life

Ikea offers an easy-to-use guide for disassembling its furniture

You may not be anywhere near the office water cooler right now, but we still want to spotlight the most talked about creative from the brands that should be on your radar. Today, we're looking at Ikea's new furniture guidelines.

Following years spent guiding home decorators on how to assemble their flatpack furniture, Ikea has reversed its iconic 'easy to follow' instructions to now provide a step-by-step guide on how to disassemble its furniture.

Although this may seem like an odd move, the campaign hopes to encourage people to extend the life of their furniture, by showing customers that what goes up, can easily come back down.

Whether the items need a new home or a new place in the home, the 'Disassembly Instructions' provide customers with the best way to take it apart - one Allen key at a time, and easy-to-use guides have been designed for Ikea's six best-selling products.

“Sustainability is at the heart of everything we do at Ikea and we remain committed to introducing new ways to promote circular consumption, in order to help meet our goal of becoming a fully circular and climate positive business by 2030, in addition to making sustainable living accessible and affordable to all," explains Hege Sæbjørnsen, country sustainability manager at Ikea UK & Ireland.

The temple of tiny pencils has, in recent years, blended its branding to become steadily greener, and is placing time and effort into refining its approach to sustainability.

It has an ultimate aim of becoming fully circular as a business by 2030, which means it needs to ensure 100% of the materials used to make its 12,000-strong product catalogue are made from recycled and recyclable materials.

Back in January, it chose to reallocate its Christmas ad spend into its sustainability efforts instead, with an eco-focused campaign spelt out its commitment to the circular economy, by inspiring people to think differently about the benefits of living a life of moderation over a life of excess.