Corona repurposes waste plastic bags for Brazilian art exhibition

Corona repurposes waste plastic bags for a Brazilian art exhibition

Corona beer has hit upon a novel use for waste plastic after curating a one-of-a-kind art exhibition which reproduces Old Masters in the medium of plastic.

Ditching a paintbrush, activist artist Eduardo Srur instead went fishing among some of Brazil’s biggest city rivers to amass a stockpile of discarded plastic bags which were then reconstituted as an unconventional outdoor art gallery.

Conceived by Soko Agency the initiative saw a variety of iconic artworks adapted including Leonardo da Vinci's “Monalisa”; Edvard Munch's “The Scream” and (most appropriately) Hokusai's “The Great Wave of Kanagawa”.

Bruna Buás, Corona's marketing director, said: “Sao Paulo is the most populous city in South America and receives thousands of visitors daily, and we know the potential that this represents for fighting plastic waste. And this partnership with Eduardo Srur is the first step for these people to get even more involved with the cause, as people from Sao Paulo also play a key role as change agents to help protect our paradise.”

Srur added: “If these artworks are present in the history of civilization for more than 100 years, the plastic you throw in nature will be too. The ocean is the mother of all rivers, so the plastic we throw on the streets of São Paulo will go to our polluted metropolitan rivers that flow into the sea.”

All the works will now be auctioned off in support of Pimp my Carroca, a movement helping to improve the lives of waste pickers. It is estimated that over eight million tons of plastic waste are inappropriately dumped in watercourses worldwide every year.

Previously, Corona has helped households in Bali to prepare for a ban on single-use plastics by donating 20,000 reusable bags made from recycled plastics.

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