World Media Group argues high quality journalism delivers greater ad viewability

Advertising analysis quantifies the benefits associated with ‘quality journalism’

An advertising study has shown a strong correlation between viewability and editorial standards. It found that ads displayed within examples of ‘quality journalism’ generated consistently better attention and viewability metrics.

Confirming quality over quantity the findings were delivered by World Media Group (WMG), a grouping of premium media brands, based on analysis by SAAS Analytics and measurement specialists Moat.

Quantifying this benefit the survey found that digital ads running across WMG’s brands in the third quarter of 2018 outperformed Moat’s benchmarks by between 13% and 144% in terms of engagement across display, desktop, mobile web and video desktop.

Display desktop ads, for instance, attained an active page dwell time of 66 seconds, fully 39% higher than the industry average. Mobile display promotions utilising WMG content achieved 35% more interactions and 32% higher viewability rates than the benchmark, boasting 13% longer engagement rates to boot.

In video desktop terms meanwhile, WMG inventory was shown to attain 22% higher viewability rates with both audible and visible completion rates rating 144% higher than Moat’s benchmark figures for the third quarter of 2018.

WMG chair and head of sales and client services, EMEA, at The Economist wrote: “The impact of poor quality journalism and fake news over the last couple of years has made consumers much more savvy about where they go to for information. Trusted editorial sources including the titles in the WMG’s portfolio have experienced a positive boost as a result; we’re now seeing a halo effect, translating into a more engaged audience for advertisers.

“The Moat analysis underscores what we have long believed – that consumers are more receptive to advertising when it’s presented within an environment of high-quality content that they trust.”

Viewability remains a key battleground for advertisers concerned that they may be communicating with empty space, a particular issue for television.

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