The Drum partners with Guitar Social as it beats Guinness World Record for longest guitar lesson

Music school The Guitar Social has entered the Guinness World Records books for the longest guitar lesson held.

The London-based music school held the attempt, in partnership with The Drum, to raise funds to help blind and partially sighted people learn how to play the guitar.

Music celebrities like The Cure and Stevie Wonder, one of the most famous visually impaired musicians, backed the attempt.

Led by Thomas Binns, the owner of The Guitar Social, the non-stop guitar tutorial kicked off at 6.30pm on 18 July and continued until 6.35pm on 19 July, with groups of around 20 people being taught to play across 12 individual sessions.

It featured participants of all ages, including 97-year-old Mary Barsh from Pimlico, London, who was the lesson’s oldest participant and had taken up the guitar lessons despite being almost blind. Members from the media and marketing industry were also involved including Unruly, The Drum and Propeller PR.

“I am so happy that I have secured the Guinness World Records title for the longest guitar lesson. 24 hours is a long time to teach and there were times when it felt as if the attempt would never end - however with the support of my students I kept going and made it to the end. Now the attempt is over, my fingers certainly need a break from playing the guitar,” said Binns.

“I believe that everyone should have a shot at making music and that includes vulnerable communities. My attempt will help open up lessons to those who are blind and partially sighted, helping them to connect with others, reduce social isolation and promote self-esteem.’

The attempt raised over £22,000 on Crowdfunder, which will help The Guitar Social to extend its course further and reach out to more vulnerable communities.

Funds will also be put towards recruiting specialist guitar teachers so that classes can be hosted in more centers across the UK. The Guitar Social also hopes to invest in guitars, designed specifically for the visually impaired.

Companies and music fans that would like to support Binns and his work can find out more at here.

Footage from the event itself, including an interview with Mary Barsh can be viewed in the accompanying video above.

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