India probes Google's dominance in the country with anti-competitive investigation

If found guilty, Google could be fined up to 10% of its local revenue or 300% of its net profits.

The Competition Commission of India (CCI) has found that Google abused the dominant position of its Android operating system (OS) in the country and has ordered a full investigation.

CCI, which is the country’s local anti-monopoly regulator, began looking at the Android OS in 2018 after it received a tip-off from whistleblowers. According to Reuters, the investigation will take about a year to conclude and could see Google executives summoned before the regulator.

If found guilty, Google could be fined up to 10% of its local revenue or 300% of its net profits.

“Android has enabled millions of Indians to connect to the internet by making mobile devices more affordable,” a Google spokesperson told TechCrunch.

“We look forward to working with the Competition Commission of India to demonstrate how Android has led to more competition and innovation, not less.”

Google has been facing potential regulations globally as countries seek to ensure the tech giant is kept in check.

The European Union has agreed to scrap decades-old rules and force Google and Facebook to distribute revenues more evenly with the creative sector and remove copyright-protected content.

The UK government has also called on the competition watchdog to launch an inquiry into the UK's digital ad market, specifically to probe the dominance of the Facebook-Google duopoly.

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