Durex accused of using soft porn in Chinese social media marketing

Durex falls foul of Chinese censors with social media campaign

Chinese censors have accused Durex of using “soft pornography” in its social media marketing campaigns.

The condom brand is the latest company to come under fire as China’s government continues to crackdown on inappropriate content online.

The ads, which were created in a joint promotion with Chinese bubble tea brand Heytea, were accused of featuring suggestive images and crude taglines.

The ads included a picture of a white, creamy drop of bubble tea coming out of a cup which featured the tagline: “Tonight, not a drop left”. This was then followed by the question: “Do you remember our second date? I said to you, ‘Your first bite is the most precious’.”

Heytea then responded to the post on its own social media channel: “I remember the date. We agreed from that day on, my cheese will always be on your lips.” The bubble tea brand is popular in China for a tea that features a cream cheese topping.

The posts attracted a strong consumer response and have since been edited with Heytea also issuing an apology.

Durex is known in China for creating topical ads which feature humour and innuendo.

The National Office Against Pornographic and Illegal Publications said the adverts by Durex could “ruin the Chinese” and stated that crude advertising content was “more frightening than pornography”, according to reports by South China Morning Post.

In a statement on Weibo, it said, “The office has added such content to its ongoing crackdown on vulgar content online. We urge and guide all internet platforms to enhance discipline, establish standards and maintain a bottom line.”

It comes as the Chinese government continues to crack down on inappropriate and vulgar content on the internet, earlier this month Chinese internet giant Sina Corp suspended its news and blog apps after it was accused of not doing enough to moderate unsuitable and vulgar content.

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