Ad Council and Hunter Hayes call out ‘warning signs’ to avoid drinking and driving

Multi-Grammy nominee Hunter Hayes has teamed with the Ad Council and the US Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in the latest ‘Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving’ campaign effort.

Hayes is spreading the word that people should be aware of their buzzed ‘warning signs’ to avoid drinking and driving. Every individual has their own personal signs – like taking too many selfies or texting an ex – that indicate that they are impaired and shouldn’t drive.

Hayes notes his own – when he starts trying to solve the world’s problems – which he says in a public service ad, reiterating the importance of finding a safe way home after drinking, and discusses the meaning behind his songs ‘One Shot’ and ‘Heartbreak.’

“Just like in my song ‘One Shot,’ once you start drinking you don’t always make the best decisions,” said Hayes. “That’s why I know my buzzed warning signs. When I see one of these signs, I call a car or a friend instead of getting behind the wheel.”

According to the latest traffic data from the NHTSA, over 10,000 people in America died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes in 2017. Men were more than four times as likely as women to be the alcohol-impaired driver in a fatal car crash. The national ‘Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving’ campaign calls on young men to recognize their buzzed warning signs and make the decision to not drive after drinking.

“Whether or not you’ll drive buzzed is a decision you can only make for yourself – but once you’ve been drinking, your judgment is already impaired,” said Lisa Sherman, president and chief executive of the Ad Council. “As a young man himself, Hunter is the ideal person to share this message and remind his fans to plan ahead to avoid driving drunk or buzzed.”

The PSAs were created pro bono by media and creative agency OMD Create and produced with production companies Hyfn and Rodeo Show.

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