MTV trials Facebook Watch's live quiz capabilities in the UK

MTV Stax to launch on Facebook Watch

MTV UK is working with Facebook Watch to deliver a live social quiz show called MTV Stax.

Using Facebook’s Watch tab, and its inbuilt quiz show capabilities, the free-to-play game will deliver 10 pop culture questions to viewers baited with the promise of a cash prize.

The Viacom International Media Networks company will shoot the episodes in MTV’s London studio. It will be led by numerous network presenters with three episodes a week, for 10 weeks, scheduled to air.

MTV was one of the first it UK partners for the fledgling Facebook service.

Joanna Wells, vice president of digital content, youth and entertainment, said: "We know that there’s a great appetite at the moment for live interactive quiz shows and our fans are tapped into popular culture, so this feels like a very natural fit for MTV."

MTV UK and MTV Music UK boast five million followers across Facebook, each of whom will receive a notification when the show kicks off. The show will be promoted in advance by MTV's social channels and Facebook will likely give it top placement in its Watch Tab in the run-up.

The show is much in the vein of popular quiz app Trivia HQ, which is on a path to attract brands to its unique advertising capabilities.

Earlier this month, Heart radio (from Global), launched its own Facebook Watch quiz fronted by Heart Evening Presenter, Sian Welby. Heart’s Triple Play is two weeks into a 10-week run.

Watch aims to be a home for longer-format shows on the social network as it looks to increase the quality of content. Monetising the service is TV-esque pre and mid-roll ads and display banners which can crop up below videos. In this experience, Facebook is hoping to up video view times after it normalised endless newsfeed thumb-scrolling and its own suite of measurement metrics.

The social network was forecast to spend around $1bn on owned content for the service by the end of 2018.

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