Marketers urged to tap into revival of popularity of podcasts in Australia

As listeners spend an average of four hours consuming podcasts, marketers can engage in long-form communication with them.

Podcasts have seen a recent revival and surge in popularity in Australia with over 3.8 million Australian adults listening to a podcast in the last three months.

The growing interest in podcasts and their potential as a marketing channel is attributed to listeners becoming familiar with titles such as ‘Serial’ and more recently, Australia’s very own ‘The Teacher’s Pet’.

With over one in five people engaging with the medium, providing the scale that brands are looking for, a new study commissioned by OMD, ARN, Macquarie Media, Mamamia, Nova Entertainment, Southern Cross Austereo and Whooshka uncovered insights about the podcast consumer group’s attitude towards different types of advertising, and how brands can deliver a true value exchange with podcast listeners.

It found that as listeners spend an average of four hours consuming podcasts, marketers can engage in long-form communication with their target group. The study was conducted through online interviews with more than 4,000 Australians.

“Podcasting is a rapidly growing channel that offers marketers new ways to connect. This research piece aims to give our clients the necessary information to understand podcasts from the consumer’s point of view, the role podcasts can play and the opportunity for brands,” said Aimee Buchanan, the chief executive officer of OMD Australia.

Podcasts are experiencing mixed results with publishers and brands around the world as Google has launched its own Android podcast app, Google Podcasts, while BuzzFeed News reduced its podcasting team to double down on original video.

The IAB Australia’s Audio Council has also released an Audio Creative Best Practice Showcase for marketers and advertisers, partnering with insurance brand Choosi, to bring their recommendations to life.

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