Carlsberg sticks to tradition with global rebrand because it’s probably the best

Carlsberg rebrands globally

Carlsberg has rebranded globally, using a clean and modern take on its famed font and icons, and focusing on Carlsberg founder JC Jacobsen’s brand purpose of a 'constant pursuit of better'.

Rather than follow trends, the design has instead looked to ‘better’ its 171 years of history, retaining the font, crown, hope leaf and signature, but creating a brand that it hopes can travel around the world.

In doing so, the brand also hopes to reiterate the famed tagline of the beer of being ‘probably the best beer in the world’ which will also be used.

Jessica Spence, chief commercial officer at Carlsberg Group, said: "The Carlsberg brand has an incredibly unique history. There's no other brand that played this sort of role as a turning point in the global brewing industry. That makes it a fantastic opportunity to work on."

It follows a series of ad campaigns and moves by the brand's marketing team to make the brand more 'premium', including its most recent 'The Danish Way' campaign which saw it create a caviar beer for the World Cup.

The redesign was carried out by Taxi Studio, with the Scandinavian markets first to see the new design, with the rest of the world to follow in 2019.

Spencer Buck, creative partner at Taxi Studio, said: "I think the public, when they really get to know Carlsberg, will fall in love with it. Brand's search for purpose is a bit of a buzzword, but it's incredibly important. Carlsberg's had purpose since 1847."

Commenting on the traditional take on the rebrand, he added: "The new design system is very much anti-trend. It's designed to be permanent, or more permanent than any iteration of the design system has been before. There shouldn't be any need to change this for a good long time. That's part of the sustainable thinking that was built into the very core of the brief."

For those who think this still looks like the old Carlsberg, Jessica Felby, design director on the project for Carlsberg, adds: "Designs used to last 10 years, then five, now brands redesign every three years. It's all based on trends that go out of style. We weren't going to do that. It's only when you see the previous design that you realise that the new design is new, because it looks like a design that's always been there. It looks like what Carlsberg should always have been."

Get The Drum Newsletter

Build your marketing knowledge by choosing from daily news bulletins or a weekly special.