Ad of the Day: Danone gently ribs the constant cycle of food fads in the Konfusion Kitchen

Rigged with hidden cameras and a company of actors, an undercover film of Danone’s pop-up restaurant – the ‘Konfusion Kitchen’ – highlights the current absurdity of ever-changing healthy food trends.

Vice creative agency Virtue Scandinavia created the Copenhagen pop-up to test just how much foodies are willing to put with in their plight to sample zeitgeist dishes. Diners are first presented with a menu serving ‘holistic, organismic, biodynamic, low carb, raw food’, yet with a ping of the bell the chef declares the fare of offer is changing to ‘paleo, high protein, slow food’.

Customers are presented with food such as an ostrich egg slowly cooking under an infrared light, before this is whisked away as the menu changes once again. The process continues (at one point the eatery turns into a ‘Kombucha Rave’) until the waiter reveals to the diners that they are, in fact, the subjects of an advertising experiment.

“We knew that the guests were going to look the restaurant up online so we had to do a full website, a Facebook event and an Instagram account with followers and community management to make sure it all seemed legit,” said Emil Asmussen, associate creative director at Virtue Scandinavia.

Aurèlie Patterson, brand marketing manager at Danone Brand Strategy and Equity, added: “Right now the world is overflowing with do’s and dont’s in regards to paleo, raw food, juicing intolerance, dairy and so on and so forth. The list seems never-ending and even more trends continually appear.

“We thought that we’d help make everything easier by creating a product so simple that you’d never doubt its beneficiary abilities. The film underlines the absurdity of the ever-changing food trends in a fun and inclusive way.”

The film, which includes the end line ‘Healthy eating can be simple’, will be distributed across multiple European markets including Spain, France, Belgium, Romania and Hungary.

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