Dietz & Watson's 'Deli Deli' delivers fresh meats and cheeses on Super Bowl Sunday

Bud Light's 'Dilly Dilly' is an advertising juggernaut, and now Philadelphia delicatessen food purveyor Dietz & Watson is paying homage to the campaign with its spoof, 'Deli Deli' for the Super Bowl.

Playing off the medieval theme of the original, Ye Royal Deli is giving out free meats and cheeses in real-time today (Feb. 4) with the help of the company's new agency-of-record, Philadelphia-based creative agency Red Tettemer O’Connell + Partners (RTO+P).

On Super Bowl Sunday, Ye Royal Deli officially opens for business, with an attendant accepting orders for Dietz & Watson meats and cheeses via a ten-hour livestream that will run across Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. As viewers place their #delideli orders in the video’s comment section, the attendant will slice up a quarter-pound of the requested meat and cheese using Ye Old Deli Slicer – expecting to fulfill approximately 200 orders over the course of the day. Plus, one lucky customer will have the chance to win meat and cheese for life.

The brand will deliver orders via Amazon Fresh – same day for all customers in one of Amazon Prime’s 37 markets, including Philly. For select local orders, medieval page boys will make deliveries, outfitted with bikes and motorbikes dressed as horses.

As a way to garner pre-game buzz, RTO+P worked with the brand the create a 30-second TV spot, which is running in the Philadelphia market and will air four times leading up to kickoff. The ad features the Ye Royal Deli Attendant spreading the word about Ye Royal Deli and inviting viewers to tune into the livestream.

Supporting elements include a custom microsite, DeliDeli.live, that will host the live stream and feature customer giveaways; national paid social and digital support driving to the livestream, influencer and celebrity advocates, including Michael Rappaport and Anthony Anderson; and out of home digital boards in center city Philadelphia.

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