Busan Police creates a horror voyeur video to warn people who illegally download in latest campaign

Busan Police has collaborated with Cheil Worldwide to launch a campaign to reduce the circulation of voyeur videos (filming people without their knowledge).

As part of the 'Stop Downloadkill' campaign, a fake voyeur video was created by the police who went undercover and approached the ‘online black market’ of illegal voyeur videos. They uploaded various fake videos onto 23 file-sharing sites – 170 videos per day, 3,500 videos in total.

The fake voyeur videos downloaded by people ended abruptly with a ghost-like women staring at the viewers thus scaring them. The subtitles appeared as “You might be the one pushing her to commit suicide. Police are monitoring this site.”

The initiative led to a decrease of 21% in circulation of illegal voyeur videos.

According to the National Police Agency, in South Korea, hidden camera crimes have increased by 540% in the last 8 years from 807 cases in 2009 to 5,185 cases in 2016.

The campaign garnered support from lawmaker Sunmee Jin and the South Korean government which in November 2017 led to a bill being proposed to strengthen punishment for voyeur crimes in the National Assembly.

Cheil Worldwide team said: “The key idea is that we used the ‘online black market’ as media in order to change the mind of people who intends to watch voyeur videos.”

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