Digital Advertising

Google considers introducing ad-blocker for Chrome web browser

By Benjamin Cher | Reporter

April 20, 2017 | 3 min read

Google is reportedly introducing an ad-blocking feature for bot desktop and hmobile versions of its Chrome browser according to a Wall Street Journal report.

This feature would filter out certain types of online ads deemed to provide a bad user experience, and could be turned on by default. The unacceptable ad types are based on those defined by the Coalition for Better Ads in March.

The development could further add to Adblock’s woes as it struggles with flat line growth.

Google, Chrome, Coincidence Detector

Google reportedly mulling adblock feature for Chrome

Google's ad-blocking feature could be launched within weeks, but the search giant is still working out details and could potentially not release it at all, according to the WSJ.

Google could possibly block all advertising on sites with offending ads instead of the individual offending ad, strong-arming owners to meet standards or see advertising revenue disappear.

While it might seem to be shooting itself in the foot with ad-blocking, the move is said to be a defensive one according to WSJ sources. Google currently pays to be part of Adblock's “acceptable ads” program, which allows Google's ads to pass through the popular ad-blocker's filters.

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Google is hoping to suppress the growth of third-party blocking tools that charge for ads being white-listed, according to the WSJ. Ad-blocking is said to be a worrying trend for the search giant, which generated $60bn in revenue from online ads in 2016. It is also a source of concern for online publishers and services that rely on advertising revenue, many of which work with Google to help sell ads on their properties.

Chrome now accounts for 58.64% of the browser market share according to Net Market Share, and providing ad-filters within it would, overall, give Google more control over ad blocking.

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