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How GrabBike is using adtech to change social perception around driving careers

GrabBike changes social perceptions using performance marketing techniques

GrabBike, the two-wheeled business of taxi app and ride sharing giant Grab, has managed to rev up the effectiveness of a recruitment campaign that aims to change social perceptions around rider jobs using adtech.

According to GrabBike, in Vietnam the demand for its service in key cities like Hanoi is scaling faster than it can recruit drivers. A key issue is that being a bike driver (or xe om) is seen as a “face-losing job”.

The brand therefore took to digital media to try and entice more people to sign-up but found it was still struggling to get people through the process. The business eventually signed up mobile-first performance marketing firm Light Reaction to apply deeper tracking and more complex targeting and optimisation, across devices, which helped the brand understand the journey’s of potential drivers.

The campaign, a partnership with Grab's media agency MEC in Vietnam, drove 1,453 leads, compared to its target of 400, which GrabBike said was key to its partnership.

“I'm particular fond of this partnership as we are able to drive the real results here for Grab,” said Dung Dao, digital marketing manager at Grab Vietnam.

For Light Reaction, the campaign is unusual both for the use of performance marketing to sway social perceptions but also because it was a chance to show what’s capable in growing markets.

Auke Boersma, MD of Light Reaction, said: “The GrabBike Campaign was a very interesting one given the circumstantial challenges the local market presented. However we are very happy with the outcome of the campaign, and we are very happy that Grab took a chance with us to show our capabilities.”

Grab is no stranger to taking risks, however, as it became one of the first taxi apps to partner on a driverless car trial. Last year it announced plans to join a pilot scheme in Singapore.

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