Goodstuph, never ‘no’ but ‘Why not?’: Singapore’s most innovative agencies

Singapore’s most innovative agencies Goodstuph

Singapore has developed into the central hub for marketing in APAC, with many major brands now based in the city state. Add to this a government committed to a smart city mandate, and it is one of the most exciting places to be working in the industry today. The Drum takes a look at 20 of the most innovative agencies operating on the island, including Goodstuph.

One common issue with APAC is that the idea of taking risks isn’t something that’s applauded or rewarded. Failure and failing fast, as the likes of Zuckerberg and his Silicon Valley friends will attest, is part of taking risks and failure isn’t always easy to admit, let alone put on a pedestal. But Goodstuph isn’t like the rest. As the company website explains, Goodstuph is not a ‘social media marketing’ agency. It is a ‘social influence marketing’ creative force and it eschews using the former term because it has been “bastardized by one too many self-proclaimed social media experts, so the boss lady is adamant against it”.

That “boss lady” is Pat Law who founded the agency as well as a series of other businesses in Singapore that splinter from it. According to Law, her agency has been successful in pushing clients to take risks. Or, in her words, “by never saying ‘no’, but ‘why not?’”.

One example of this was for William Grant & Sons, for which the agency created a whisky distillery experience using a combination of touch-based technology and ambient event marketing in a four-day campaign called ‘Valley of the deer’. It won a myriad of awards and used technology in a new way to tell a heritage story.

But, as Law points out, the agency doesn’t believe in using tech for tech’s sake, but rather “only if it makes sense all in all”.

“Alongside digital production house Make Studios, we have experimented with the use of multi-touch tables, kinetic technology and the use of tables to control music.”

Law herself is a prominent Singaporean businesswoman and is regularly cited in the press, often celebrating entrepreneurialism. In terms of the growth of the business, and business within Singapore, she says the vibrancy of entrepreneurialism in Singapore is helped by the government: “The government is pretty supportive of innovation, grants and all, and it shows in the number of homegrown startups.”

With entrepreneurialism being pushed harder by the government and a growing creative force in Singapore’s youth emerging, it’s likely the ad industry will find itself with more agencies inspired by Pat Law and Goodstuph in years to come.

This article was originally published in the Singapore supplement of The Drum and is available for free on The Drum app which can be downloaded from the Apple App Store and Google Play.

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