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Topics include: Direct to consumer / E-commerce / Data & privacy / Martech

Morning bulletin: Andrew Neil defends bumper BBC salary, mobile budgets growth & Line big upped

Morning bulletin: Andrew Neil defends bumper BBC salary, mobile budgets growth & Line big upped

This morning’s dive into the world of marketing and advertising news brings a wealth of snippets and titbits to the surface, notably broadcaster Andrew Neil’s spirited defence of his bumper BBC salary, mobile marketers shrug off privacy concerns and Line tipped to give Facebook a run for its money.

Retail Week observes that Morrisons is to significantly ramp up its online offer after concluding an agreement with Ocado for the roll-out of a nationwide fulfilment guarantee for online orders in store at lesser cost to the consumer.

Campaign carries a report from Warc and the Mobile Marketing Association indicating that marketers are optimistic in regards to future growth in marketing budgets for the channel, despite increasing concerns over its impingement on personal privacy.

Ad Week jumps into the driving seat with Mercedes, BMW & Porsche to test drive a new push for driver ‘experiences’. This marks a new trend in offering potential customers more than just four wheels with Porsche for one pairing up individuals to offer an in-house driving instructor for a 90 minute white knuckle ride.

Over at Business Insider comes news of ‘the next big thing’ in messaging, Line, which analysts believe is best placed to challenge Facebook in key markets in Japan and throughout South East Asia courtesy of its innovative ad platform offering marketers cheaper rates.

Elsewhere the BBC reports on a ‘banking revolution’ for the UK in the wake of a two year study conducted by the Competition and Markets Authority which recommends the introduction of new phone-based apps by early 2018, set maximum fees and further efforts to encourage switching.

Reuters states that UK retail spending has bounced back from a post-Brexit dip as the good weather cheered sentiment on the High Street. Figures published by the British Retail Consortium showed retail spending was 1.9 per cent higher in July, the highest rate of increase for six months.

The Guardian picks up on an admission by BBC political correspondent Andrew Neil who has stated he earns more than the Prime Minister but adds that his workload, including fronting Daily Politics and This Week, make him good value for the broadcaster as it comes under pressure to cut its salary bill.

The broadsheet also prints news of a 28 per cent fall in global earnings at News Corp on the back of further declines in its news and book publishing businesses, despite a strong performance from its real estate classifieds businesses.

The BBC states that 40 per cent of retailers targeted in a sting operation by Trading Standards officers in England were found to be selling e-cigarettes and products to under 18s, sparking calls for tougher enforcement action to be taken.

And lastly TechCrunch returns to Pokemon Go with talk of a new ‘Nearby’ tracking system for the popular app, which purports to track down Pokemon for lazy players, allowing them to identify where monsters are hiding without the need to wander aimlessly.

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