The Economist combines its subscriber data with Sky’s for its first data-driven TV campaign

The Economist has revealed its first data-driven TV campaign, which has combined the publisher’s existing subscriber data with Sky customer data for the first time, enabling the publisher to serve the ad to specific target audiences at personalised times.

The campaign, created by UM London and Proximity London, goes live today (24 May) in the UK, exclusively on Sky channels. It centers around the concept that "the world could use another Economist reader", playing on the Economist’s appeal to a ‘globally conscious’ audience.

The commercial has been created with a call-to-action that aims to drive phone enquires. All of the data captured will directly inform the online re-targeting.

This campaign is evidence of Sky’s ambitions to act as a peer in media buying transactions through its Sky AdVance platform, which it rolled-out last year. The technology allows advertisers to target audiences across both TV and online.

Media-buyers using Sky AdVance can overlay Sky data to execute both on Sky’s media channels, as well as its other digital properties, as evidenced by the Economist campaign which will distribute digitally along with its TV release.

Mark Cripps, executive vice president, brand and digital marketing at the Economist said: “With all that’s going on in the world, there has never been a more appropriate time to read The Economist. As such, we are very excited to be promoting our brand on TV again. Since we were last active on TV, the science behind the planning and buying on TV has moved on leaps and bounds.”

Neil Peace, digital strategy director, UM London said: “We’re excited to be bringing The Economist back to TV screens across the country. The campaign represents a key step in extending our data driven programmatic media strategy into more traditional channels, ensuring our messaging is as targeted as possible.”

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