Chris Evans likens Top Gear bullying accusations to a witchhunt

With the BBC hoping for the resurgence of its Top Gear brand, once a flagship show with Jeremy Clarkson at the helm, common news of disunity under new presenter Chris Evan’s leadership will be unwelcome.

Between the Evans and co-host Matt LeBlanc’s emulation of the original trio’s controversy by causing unrest around the London Whitehall Cenotaph, media outlets are reporting onset bullying, with the BBC said to have hired an editorial lead to control the production.

Having reportedly been on the verge of quiting the role in response to interference from the broadcaster,, Evans has rubbished claims of bullying on the show.

He told the Sunday Mirror: “All these bullying claims and other allegations are just ridiculous.”

He added that constant media scrutiny was hurting his family, with the “witch-hunt” largely hurting his wife Natasha and two children.

“If you sling enough mud, some will stick to the wall… is it hurtful to see your wife - or your children - upset? Of course it is.”

Top Gear will return to the BBC in May.

Join us, it's free.

Become a member to get access to:

  • Exclusive Content
  • Daily and specialised newsletters
  • Research and analysis

Join us, it’s free.

Want to read this article and others just like it? All you need to do is become a member of The Drum. Basic membership is quick, free and you will be able to receive daily news updates.