Sunday Times reveals its annual Rich List featuring tarot theme

The Sunday Times has unveiled its annual Rich List campaign, which this year draws on a fortune-telling theme to list the UK’s wealthiest individuals.

Using a distinctive visual style of traditional 19th Century Tarot Cards created by CHI&Partners, the ‘Fortunes Told’ campaign tells the stories of how the UK’s most successful earners made their fortunes.

It will run across print and digital media and features personalities including Adele, the Beckhams, Simon Cowell, One Direction, J. K. Rowling, Rory McIlroy and Richard Branson.

The campaign uses titles from traditional Tarot Cards to depict the stars in a the kind of light associated with mediums. Adele features as ‘The Empress’ and Simon Cowell as ‘Judgement’ in a nod to his X Factor role, while J. K. Rowling appears as ‘The Queen of Wands’ in recognition of her Harry Potter legacy.

Catherine Newman, marketing & sales director at The Times and The Sunday Times, said: “As ever, the launch of our annual Rich List campaign is a significant moment for The Sunday Times, signifying as it does the arrival of one of the crown jewels of our editorial calendar. The tarot card creative enables us to tell a story about some of the list’s most famous names from a different perspective, taking a fresh approach to the theme of fortune.”

Micky Tudor, deputy executive creative director at CHI&Partners, said: “The Sunday Times’ annual Rich List campaign is one of the UK’s most consistently celebrated creative campaigns, and we’re so proud to be working on it again. We’re equally proud of the work, which captures the legacies of some of the nation’s best-known personalities in a strikingly memorable way, reimagining the definition of fortune.”

Launched in 1989 featuring the top 200 wealthiest people in the country, the list has grown to cover the top 1,000 and is now one of the biggest sales drivers of the year for The Sunday Times.

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