DDB New York named Wildlife Conservation Film Festival AOR

The Wildlife Conservation Film Festival (WCFF) has announced that DDB New York will be its pro bono agency of record. Founded in 2010, the WCFF creates public awareness programs that focus on the importance and need for the protection of global biodiversity. The main vehicle of the organization are independent films, presented at signature events, including the 2016 WCFF Film Festival, the first and only film festival in New York City dedicated to the preservation of wildlife and biodiversity, October 14-23. An additional festival will take place in Beijing, China in December 2016.

“WCFF is excited and honored to work with DDB New York,” said Christopher Gervais, WCFF founder and chief executive officer. “This partnership will give the WCFF increased exposure and attract a larger audience.”

DDB New York launched the partnership this month with WCFF rebranding, including a new logo and social presence. A new campaign is to be launched next month, focusing on raising awareness of deforestation’s impact on endangered species and on promoting wildlife procreation.

“The work that Christopher has been doing with WCFF is so important and we are humbled by the opportunity to help WCFF expand and reach bigger audiences,” said Icaro Doria, Chief Creative Officer of DDB New York.

WCFF’s featured films cover topics across natural history and conservation of biodiversity — all to connect the dots between saving species from extinction and preserving the Earth’s precious resources of food, water and clean air.

In addition, the organization promotes programs throughout the year that contribute to the protection of biodiversity and sustainability with the main goal of gaining committed action to ensure that biodiversity will be permanently protected on a global scale. An upcoming event in New York City, April 26th, includes the showing of Love Thy Nature, narrated by Liam Neeson, followed by a panel discussion led by Gervais.

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