McDonald's rejects Burger King's proposal to partner up on McWhopper

A PR stunt from Burger King asking McDonald’s to join it for a day to create a burger together in recognition of World Peace Day has been rejected.

The offer ran in advertisements placed in The New York Times and The Chicago Tribune today as well as a dedicated website. It proposed to open a pop-up restaurant for one day with staff from both companies creating and selling an amalgamation of their iconic burgers- McDonald’s Big Mac and Burger King’s Whopper- dubbed ‘The McWhopper’.

Sales would be donated to Peace One Day, a nonprofit group seeking to raise awareness of the International Day of Peace, which was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1981 for the opening of its annual meeting. The United Nations named 21 September as the day to celebrate world peace, and Burger King proposes opening the pop-up store then in a parking lot between a McDonald’s and a Burger King in Atlanta.

McDonald’s chief executive, Steve Easterbrook released a statement on the company’s Facebook page turning down the offer, saying that that the two brands could “do something bigger to make a difference” and added that “the business rivalry between the companies shouldn't be equated to the real pain and suffering of war”

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Burger King set out the details of the proposal on mcwhopper.com which also features a video clip with Peace One Day founder, Jeremy Gilley, who says “corporate activism on this scale creates mass awareness and awareness creates action and action saves lives”.

McDonald’s decision to turn the offer has come under widespread criticism online however.

Last year Burger King lost its position as the World’s number two burger chain to Wendy’s though it has since recovered its position behind Mcdonald’s and posted a 6.7 per cent gain in sales at stores open at least a year in the second quarter.

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