Reverberate: US media and marketing news you need to know – GoPro acquires Kolor, Nasdaq leak Twitter results early and Google to sell promoted tweets

Morning all, here’s a glimpse at all the media and marketing news you should know today.

1. GoPro has acquired Kolor, a virtual reality company that focuses on 360-degree media, says the Next Web. Along with the announcement, the camcorder firm has also released an interactive YouTube clip that allows users to drag and explore the video, viewing from any variety of angles.

2. Nasdaq released Twitter's financial results too early, reports the Wall Street Journal. The social network delivered its weakest quarterly revenue growth as a publicly traded company, casting a shadow on its fledgling advertising business.

3. However, the micro-blogging site has announced a new deal with Google, writes AdWeek. Brands buying ads from the search giant can also order promoted tweets as part of the package.

4. An app fault with Apple's iPad has allegedly grounded 'a few dozen' American Airline flights, asserts the Guardian. Pilots using the iPads as 'electronic flight bags' were delayed after the hosting app crashed, affecting multiple planes throughout the airline fleet.

5. Uber is quietly testing a massive merchant delivery program, says Tech Crunch. The startup is apparently planning to launch a service that would allow online shoppers to get same-day delivery of goods through both UberRush couriers and Uber drivers.

6. Facebook has threatened Europe with fewer features due to fragmented regulation, reports the Verge. Facebook's chief of public policy, Richard Allan, wrote a critique of the guidelines in today's Financial Times.

7. McDonald’s has limited its menu in an effort to speed up kitchens and simplify customers' choices, claims Bloomberg. The chain, which is facing six straight quarters of declining same-stores sales in the US, is to get rid of the Deluxe Quarter Pounder burger and six of its chicken sandwiches.

8. And a new report in the Washington Post shows Government agencies are less keen on letting employees use personal devices for official work following Hilary Clinton's email scandal. The past 12 months has seen agencies become more cautious about adopting a 'bring your own device' policy, citing concerns about security and liability.

Stay in the media and marketing news loop at thedrum.com and check out yesterday’s round-up here.

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