WSJ goes mobile-friendly with responsive website

The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) has become the latest publisher to retool its site for the mobile age, crafting a fully-responsive experience it hopes will boost the value of its content for both readers and advertisers.

Billed as a fast-loading, modern hub of content, the site places a larger emphasis on visual content. Similar to the Guardian’s recent revamp, the new design streamlines navigation to better surface the WSJ’s core coverage areas such as Business, Economy and Politics.

Meanwhile ads are now more seamlessly integrated to match the article and section pages. Publishers are increasingly embedding the feature into their sites as they look to convince brands to ditch display ads and spend on the more expensive native formats. The Guardian opted for the native approach when it overhauled its site earlier this year, a design it said was futureproofed for when ad inventory is sold on engagement and not clicks.

Readers can also create a personalised list of stock prices as well as access in-depth market overviews by region at the top of each page that include currencies and interest rates.

Gerard Baker, editor in chief of the WSJ, said: “The new WSJ.com is a fitting platform for our peerless journalism and improves the way we deliver content to our savvy and ambitious readers.

“This represents a continued evolution of the Journal’s digital transformation, and it will be instrumental in widening our reach around the globe. This is just the latest and most powerful example yet, of how the Journal is improving and adapting to the digital needs of our subscribers.”

The site’s relaunch follows the revamped WSJ Android app that now works across all phone and tablet sizes.

The WSJ will also launch on the Apple Watch extending its suite of iOS products.

The launch comes as publishers and advertisers scramble to adapt to Google’s decision to favour mobile-friendly sites in search results. Dubbed “mobilegeddon”, the changes are being rolled out in the US first.

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