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Movie studios increasingly turn to 3D-printed costumes and props

Movie studios are increasingly turning to special effects companies with 3D printing capabilities to create costumes and props on a fast-turnaround basis.

The studios have started looking to 3D-printing as a way of producing elaborately designed costumes and props within tight timeframes, according to Sky News.

The development could make the process of moulding costumes and props much less laborious for actors on set who are often asked to have casts developed during filming.

Grant Pearmain, director at FB FX, told Sky News the design process has been revolutionised by the technology. "A 3D printer can make something that a normal person just can't physically make, by the way it prints, kind of overlaps and underlaps," he said.

Film studios have deployed the use of 3D printing techniques for some time, with well-known examples such as the James Bond Aston Martin (pictured) featured in Skyfall among objects to be 3D printed.

However, increasingly 3D printing is being deployed to create items which can be used straight away.

Parts of actor Christian Bale’s helmet and armour in the film Exodus: Gods And Kings, in which he played Moses, were 3D printed.

Menawhile the helmet worn by actor Chris Pratt when he starred as Star Lord in Guardians Of The Galaxy was printed ready to wear straight away.

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