Castrol, Johnson & Johnson and Continental call time on Fifa sponsorship deals

Embattled football governing body Fifa has been hit by a hat trick of sponsor departures after Castrol, Johnson & Johnson and Continental all called time on their association with the organisation.

Their stampede to the exit door as second tier World Cup sponsors follows hot on the heels of Sony and Emirates, after they decided against renewing their own first tier partnerships, which expired last year.

It is the latest blow for scandal-prone Fifa president Sepp Blatter who has endured a torrid 12 months at the helm of the umbrella group, culminating in the departure of five top tier companies which suggest the brand may have become more of a liability than an asset.

Conservative MP Damian Collins, who heads up the New Fifa Now pressure group, said: “Fifa is a toxic brand. I think that’s why companies who care about their reputation don’t want to be associated.

“That means they in turn must feel their customers, who would include football fans around the world, don’t want them to be associated with Fifa either.”

Fifa has been embroiled in a long-running controversy over alleged wrongdoing in awarding the next two World Cups and is currently holding a ballot to elect a new president – a role which Blatter remains odds on favourite to win.

Feeding into this disaffection with Fifa sports brand Skins, in a campaign orchestrated by BBD Perfect Storm, has proclaimed itself a non-multi-million pound official non-sponsor of the ailing body designed to express its ‘contempt’ for the organisation and Blatter as he seeks his fifth term in office.

Explaining their unconventional move Skins chairman Jaimie Fuller said the initiative was geared toward highlighting “all the values the brands’ don’t share", adding that the ““exciting non-association will shine a light on the Fifa’s un-progressive stance, dis-credited values and all round non-integrity”

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