Alan Rusbridger to step down from Guardian editor-in-chief role to chair The Scott Trust

Alan Rusbridger, editor-in-chief of the Guardian, is set to step down from his role in summer 2015, to become chair of The Scott Trust.

He will succeed Dame Liz Forgan, current chair of The Scott Trust, which safeguards the editorial future and independence of the Guardian.

Forgan said: “Alan has been the outstanding editor of his generation. Fully embracing the opportunities of the digital age, he has built on the best traditions of his distinguished predecessors, transforming the Guardian from a print-only national newspaper into the world's leading quality newspaper website.

“We are delighted that The Scott Trust and the wider Group will continue to benefit from his experience, overseeing the independent body that guarantees the editorial integrity and commercial future of the Guardian.”

Rusbridger will become chair of The Scott Trust in 2016, when Forgan reaches the end of her term.

Having joined the Guardian in 1979, he has held the position of editor since 1995. This year he received the Right Livelihood Honorary Award.

He said: “In global journalism, there are a handful of roles that have the capability to redefine our industry. I am privileged to have held one of those roles for 20 years, a period in which successful newspapers have become global content providers, reaching audiences in dramatically new and valuable ways.

“I am honoured to succeed the quite brilliant Liz Forgan as chair of The Scott Trust, preserving the independent editorial values and the long-term financial stability upon which our future depends. We have strong future leaders in place with unparalleled news and digital experience, and I know that our journalism will be in the best possible hands.”

The process by which The Scott Trust will appoint the new editor-in-chief will be announced in due course, with Rusbridger to step down following the appointment.

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