Unicef UK unveils its Glasgow Commonwealth Games Child Rights Launchpad

Unicef UK has launched a a website to protect the rights of Scottish children in the wake of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, which was designed by digital agency e3.

The game has a variety of colourful characters

The scheme, called the ‘Child Rights Launchpad’ was created to help inform children of the rights they are entitled to and to teach them of the plight of kids across the Commonwealth, in an interactive way.

Unicef has partnered with Glasgow 2014 and the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) to deliver the website which features games and information - all focused on harnessing the power of sports to promote equality.

E3 was awarded the contract to create the website with gaming challenges for youngsters aged between three and 18, following a competitive pitch.

Teresa Bergin, director of UK programmes at Unicef UK, said: “We are delighted to be working with e3 to deliver this exciting project.

“It will enthuse, empower and engage children and young people about rights in the context of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child - the absolute focus of Unicef’s work to save and change children’s across the world.”

Scott MacDonald, senior account director of e3, said: “Our concept will harness the popularity of online activity to engage children and then encourage and support them as they go out into the real world to complete the challenges.

“The Child Rights Launchpad is a fantastic initiative and we are delighted to have the opportunity to be involved in a project that will have such a far reaching impact and to play our part in the delivery of the legacy of the 2014 Commonwealth Games.”

The Launchpad will went live earlier this month as a free platform for kids to learn about their rights.

Earlier this year, Unicef gave the Drum a peek at its Commonwealth Games digital centre where the social media team was based.

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