Google sets up web page for people to apply for ‘right to be forgotten’ after EU court ruling

Google has responded to the European Union Court of Justice’s ruling on the ‘right to be forgotten’ with the launch of a web page where people can make requests to have information about them deleted from search results.

European citizens can apply to have information deleted via the online form on the web page. Google will then assess each individual request and make a decision that aims to balance the privacy rights of the individual with the public’s right to know and distribute information, the search giant has stated.

On the web page the company has said: “Please note that this form is an initial effort. We look forward to working closely with data protection authorities and others over the coming months as we refine our approach.”

Those looking to apply via the web form need to provide the URL for each link that appears in a Google search for their name that they wish to be removed. They must then explain why the linked page is about them, or a third party if the individual is submitting a form on behalf of someone else. Finally they must then state why they believe the URL in the search results to be deleted, in line with one of the court's criteria of being irrelevant, outdated or otherwise inappropriate.

Applicants will also need to supply a valid copy of a photo ID to fill out the form.

The European Court of Justice ruled that Google must adhere to the 'right to be forgotten' and said that the internet giant must delete "inadequate, irrelevant of no longer relevant" data from its results, when requested to do so by members of the public, earlier this month.

Brands and agencies alongside ad industry body ISBA later questioned the ruling and what it may signal for the future of search, online publishing and brands.

Meanwhile media lawyers also showed divided opinion regarding the ramifications of the ruling.

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