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Rosie Arnold to head up Roses Awards judging panel

As the deadline for the 2014 Roses Creative Awards draws near, The Drum catches up with chair of the judges Rosie Arnold, to find out about her illustrious career so far – from her route into the industry to the people she has met along the way and the work she is most proud of.

As deputy executive creative director at BBH, Rosie Arnold is one of very few women holding a senior role in the creative department of an advertising agency and has been behind mould-breaking creative work for clients including Pretty Polly and Levi’s in the 80s; the Independent and Tag Heuer in the 90s; Lynx and Robinsons in the 2000s and most recently Bailey’s and Yeo Valley. She was also the 2012 president of D&AD, during the organisation's 50th anniversary year.

Who better then to oversee this year's Roses Creative Awards – the awards show that recognises great creative thinking across advertising, design and digital disciplines?

To ensure you get your work in from of Arnold, as well as the rest of this year’s Roses Creative Awards judging panel which includes Jason Andrews of Rapp London, OgilvyOne’s Rick Sear and 23Red’s Sean Kinmont, visit www.rosescreativeawards.com. Deadline for entries is Friday 14 February.

The Roses Creative Awards take place in Manchester on 15 May. For more information contact Caity Ryan at caity.ryan@thedrum.com or on 0141 559 6063.

When did you first become aware of advertising as a career?My mum discovered an old careers advice report from when I was 12 and one of the suggestions was an advertising art director. Wow! I was at a private girls school and we weren’t really encouraged to work and I can't say it registered with me, but I loved art and went to art school. It was there my boyfriend (now husband) suggested that my love of ideas would be great in advertising. That’s when I really researched it.Can you remember one specific ad that made you think ‘that’s what I want to do for a living’?I grew up with a lot of the best British ads, mainly created by John Webster, and Cretsa Bear (“It’s Frothy Man”) had us all imitating the bear and the movements. I think that was the start of things.What was your route into the industry?I went to D&AD evening classes as Central St Martins didn't do advertising courses. It was a great way of learning, understanding the business, building up a portfolio and meeting contacts. My big break was after working on a placement at CDP I got a phone call telling me a little "hot shop" BBH was looking for a freelance team over Christmas. I was lucky enough to be interviewed by the great Sir John Hegarty and even luckier to be offered the work. I haven't left since.What has been your most memorable experience working in the industry?I was president of D&AD in its 50th year (2012) and had to present the whole Gala 50th night to 2000 people, including all my heroes such as the Apple design team, Sir John Hegarty, Hugh Hudson and David Putnam to name but a few. That was so very daunting.Who is the most inspiring person you have worked with?Everyday working at BBH is an inspiration. John Hegarty, Nick Gill, Mark Reddy, Nick Kidney, David Kolbuz… the list is endless. When I was art school I envied the impressionists – they met and shared work everyday, they inspired each other to be bold and push boundaries. I know it will sound pretentious, but being surrounded by people who I admire and who are such masters constantly pushes me to do better. What has been your proudest achievement?Winning my first yellow pencil for Lynx Ideal Woman.And what has been the biggest challenge?I think getting clients to see that just because I am from a generation best known for TV I can actually think digitally – it is a fantastic new tool with so much potential.What are the 3 best ads you have ever worked on?

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Yeo Valley, The Churned: It was a massive challenge. Make Organic yogurt appeal to everyone, not just the middle classes. Make people realise it is a real place. Make people pronounce the name correctly. It was nail biting stuff but when we launched in X factor with a full length rap we could instantly see not just Britain but the world go mad for it. Over a million hits within 24 hours.

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Lynx, Getting Dressed: Turned Lynx into a love story.

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Pretty Polly, Smooth Running: The one where the car breaks down and she fixes it with her stocking. Years old, but a great example of girl power.And what are the 3 best ads you never worked on?

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Channel 4 Paralympics, Meet the Superhumans: It changed peoples perceptions of disability.

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Gatorade, Replay: It was a left field way of solving a problem.

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Sony Bravia, Balls: It was so original and still is beautiful to watch.Which industry legend’s work you most admire?John Webster. His work was continually charming, witty and innovative – and has stood the test of time.And who working in the industry now do you predict will be held up as a legend of tomorrow?Nick Gill. He has not only been behind most of the ground breaking work of the last decade but he has moulded one of the finest creative departments in the world. I am sure people will look back at who Nick managed to gather in the creative department today and wonder how so many talented creatives could be under one roof. Nick also has the ability to spot and bring on new talent. The team behind The Guardian 3 Little Pigs and Google Posters were a junior team that Nick found. He is an inspirational leader who is loved by the department. What advice would you offer someone starting out in the industry?Never ever lose your enthusiasm. What makes a great idea?Simplicity. The hardest place to get to.Where do you get your inspiration from?Everything.

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