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By Jennifer Faull, Deputy Editor

September 26, 2013 | 2 min read

Breast Cancer Care has launched a campaign on the back of a study into body image and breast cancer.

Influencing the campaign was a study of 600 people, which found that 88 per cent of those who have or have had breast cancer said the disease and its treatment has had a negative impact on the way they now feel about their bodies and 68 per cent saying that it has affected their sexual and intimate relationships.

72 per cent said breast cancer had made them feel less confident about their body.

Working with Arthur London, the posters and accompanying film (the latter produced pro bono) highlights body image and finding confidence after a breast cancer diagnosis by sharing the powerful images and stories of different women, who all reveal their mastectomy scars.

Overall, the charity is hoping to show that it can be possible to find confidence after breast cancer and that there is support available.

It comes as part of a wider rebrand, also overseen by Arthur, as it looks to reach a wide audience - currently only one person in 100 knows of Breast Cancer Care.

Actress and Breast Cancer Care ambassador Amanda Mealing is backing the campaign. She said of her own experience: “Once I was reminded that who I am is so much more than what’s been taken away, my confidence began to grow. Breast cancer really does have a big impact on how you feel. That’s why I’m supporting Breast Cancer Care’s powerful new ad campaign. These wonderful images show that everyone has their own way of finding their way through this disease but it is possible to feel good about yourself.”

The campaign rolled out today, 26 September, and is being supported through Facebook, Twitter and Adwords activity. The charity’s corporate partners and brands including Asda, QVC and Dorothy Perkins have all pledged support to the campaign through their networks.

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