Viral video CTR steadily increasing according to the Viral Ad Network research

2011 and 2012 videos were analysed to created the infographic

The mean and median click-through-rates (CTR) for video campaigns has increased from 2011 to 2012, according to an infographic released by the Viral Ad Network based on analysis from all its campaigns in 2011 and 2012.

The analysis was carried out to see which videos received the highest level of engagement, in order to provide some tips and insight for marketers on how to optimise CTR of their links.

After noticing massive variations in CTR – from 0.15 per cent to 15.1 per cent – the Viral Ad Network decided to do some benchmarking to give clients an idea what to expect from a campaign and how to get the most out of links.

Mean CTR for campaigns increased from 1 per cent in 2011 to 2.35 per cent in 2012, with median CTR growing from 0.84 per cent to 1.8 per cent in 2011 and 2012 respectively.

Charity campaigns were found to have the highest CTR by industry sector with health, sport, parenting and entertainment campaigns also proving popular. Tech campaigns appeared to struggle the most in terms of CTR.

According to the Viral Ad Network charity campaigns come out on top for CTR as generally these videos contain direct calls to action in both the video content and the video text links.

Quality of content, how engaged the online audience is with a brand, and whether or not there are any specific calls to action in the video all affect CTR according to the Viral Ad Network, another factor on CTR is also the text used for the landing page link.

Throughout 2012 links with the best CTR had the most direct calls to action, 40 per cent of videos in the top 20 included the word “click” in the text. In general the links of videos with the lowest CTR were found to be more heavily branded with direct references to company names or websites, 65 per cent of the 20 campaigns with the lowest CTR featured links which included the brand name.

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