Review of the year

By The Drum, Administrator

December 15, 2005 | 14 min read

JAN

January got off to the worst possible start with the tsunami disaster in South East Asia. Tsunami, the design management agency, decided to change its name to Tsuko in the wake of the tragedy ï Jenners, the Edinburgh department store, left 1576 to appoint TBWA\Edinburgh, only to see its own purchase by Frasers later in the year make the appointment obsolete ï Curious Oranj was appointed by Glasgow Caledonian University to create a new identity for it ï 1576 started the year on a low note, coming in after the holidays to find burglars had ransacked its Rutland Square offices ï There were a number of departures in the first month of the year; Ian McIlroy left Nevis to set up on his own, The Union’s deputy MD Jane Windass left the agency to go on sabbatical and Jason Dobson made a Contagious move from Hookson ï Former Health Scotland marketers, Martin Raymond and Ali O’Neal joined forces with ex-Feather Brooksbank chief Andy Jones to launch Cloudline Consulting, a new marketing communications agency ï The Leith Agency added Standard Life Recruitment, Scottish Enterprise and Quality Meat Scotland to its coffers and launched its first work for Coors Fine Light ï Ian Clarke is named the new sales and marketing director of Newsquest ï Family suffers the departure of Gregor Findlay and Kevin Colquhoun who leave for the bright lights of Farm in London ï Cabaret potatoes angered Hollywood legend Liza Minnelli by putting her in an ad...

FEB

Glasgow made most of the headlines in February although sometimes for not the best of reasons... Glasgow City Council launched the Glasgow City Marketing Bureau, and announced the launch of what was to be the widest account review in 2005 for its £1.2 million Scotland With Style account ï The Bridge celebrated winning Northern Ireland retailer Harry Corry, but the Glasgow Science Tower suffered one of the worst PR disasters of the year as its lift stuck trapping terrified visitors inside ï Scottish & Universal foresaw the downturn that has ended up affecting just about all Scottish newspapers when it closed its Glasgow office ï MULTIPLY, THE LEITH AGENCY and 1576 all started the year well, winning Maxxium, Baillie Gifford and Seafish respectively ï Sister magazines to The Drum – Adline and The Firm – both had news to celebrate in February. Katy Archer, formerly features editor on The Drum, joined ADLINE as editor, while THE FIRM beat a High Court Judge who challenged its inaugural Top Advocates League – in which he came last - by referring the magazine to the Press Complaints Commission ï Slightly bizarre marketing ideas also made the headlines in the second month of the year, as snooker legend Jimmy White changed his name to Jimmy Brown in a promotion with HP SAUCE and breasts became the hot medium when a woman sold her assets on Ebay to attract advertisers...

MAR

March was the month for controversy...Scottish Enterprise ended its 16 year relationship with The Media Shop by appointing Feather Brooksbank, a move thought by many to be prompted by the shock decision in 2004 to appoint Mediacom Scotland to the Scottish Executive account. The Edinburgh-based agency’s staff also had something to celebrate after Feathers was named as one of the best places to work by The Sunday Times. ï THE SCOTTISH ARTS COUNCIL attracted criticism by hiring London-based Frost Design London to work on its launch of its quarterly arts magazine, Map ï THE LEITH AGENCY brought the UK the fabulous Raoul for the new Diet Irn Bru ads, the first launch from the Glasgow-based AG Barr in recent years ï A campaign for BRITISH SAUSAGE WEEK saw a poor PR dress up as a sausage, only to look like something else. ï DENHOLM ASSOCIATES – the Edinburgh-based recruitment company started by Nikki Denholm – opened a London office ï FAMILY hired Guy Vickerstaff and Phil Evans – who closed Bond, their start-up, in August 2004 – to replace the gap left by the departure of Findlay and Colquhoun in January ï THE SCOTTISH STANDARD launched with fanfare in March, only to close after two months blaming the lack of support from the SNP...

APR

With spring, comes a reshuffle and people were on the move this month. Fopp Records’ marketing chief, Mino Russo, quit the retailer to join NEWHAVEN, while FEATHER BROOKSBANK hired new media guru Craig Wilkie, only for him to decide a few weeks later that the media agency wasn’t for him ï The merger of GWR and Capital Radio saw BEAT 106 boss Hugh Murray move to London to handle the South East for new company, GCap Media ï VIACOM poached SRH group agency sales manager Chris Terris, while Barkers made Nick Lang and Norrie Leckie redundant ï Glasgow, in association with TENNENT’S LAGER and THE GLASGOW CITY MARKETING BUREAU, became the first city to create an iTour, taking a tourism podcast to New York ï MMI and Limone merged to form DOG DIGITAL ï April was also the month for launches. Tennent’s launched its innovative Futsal campaign through NEWHAVEN and Glasgow City Council launched GLASGOW TV, its internet-based TV channel, becoming the first city in the world to have one. The Drum launched THE SCOTTISH MARKETING ASSOCIATION, to promote Scottish agencies to Scottish clients and beyond. The Drum also announced its creative awards, THE CHIP SHOP AWARDS, were to be part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe for the first time...

MAY

aAs Scotland’s media industry was pinching itself to see whether The Scottish Standard, which closed late in April, was just a bad dream, BAXTERS was upping the ante and sparking speculation of an advertising review as it finally appointed a new marketing director in the form of Andrew Fields. Incumbent agencies The Union and Mediacom were watching that space particularly closely. ï Scotland’s ad agencies pulverised their English counterparts at the ROSES AWARDS in Manchester with The Union topping the creative league with a total of 13 awards, closley followed by The Leith Agency. ï The Leith’s managing director and chairman of the Scottish IPA, Phil Adams, launched the Scottish Enterprise and IPA-funded study into Scotland’s marketing sector. ï While some 20 agencies were fighting it out to get their hands on the Glasgow Scotland with Style account, Glasgow’s marketing bureau was clashing with Glasgow City Council over content being carried on CABTIVATE’s taxi TV screens. ï THE LEITH AGENCY won the account to promote the controversial ban on smoking in public places. ï The Drum’s offices, meanwhile, were filled with talk of dildos and vibrators as DUREX launched a new range of sex aids in Scotland with The Drum breaking the exclusive news to a very grateful nation. ï May also saw the first RAJAR day for SAGA 105.2FM in Scotland, which bought tears to the eyes of some of the station’s staff as the station proved to be a hit with listeners across Glasgow....

JUN

Navyblue board director Toby Southgate got June off to a flying start by walking out to join THIRD EYE DESIGN in Glasgow, as Third Eye prepared to launch in New York. ï Trevor Beattie signed up to chair THE CHIP SHOP AWARDS’ jury. ï STAND swept the board at the Scottish Design Awards where it scooped more awards than any other consultancy. ï The Drum also launched a new publication – THE RECOMMENDED AGENCY GUIDE – to great acclaim. ï TAYBURN supremo Erick Davidson appointed Simon Farrell from The Chase, as managing director. ï FAMILY joined the network of international independent agencies, ComVort, giving MD Ian Wright some more foreign destinations to visit in the name of ‘business’. ï Edinburgh got its new city branding and tasked ELMWOOD with rolling it out across the capital, despite the unfavourable reviews. ï STORY and THE UNION won a four-way pitch to handle the marketing for Scottish and Southern Energy, Alliance Trust Savings appointed 1576 and DC INTERACT (formerly Dow Carter) scooped the online business for the Malt Whisky Society. ï Glen Gribbon moved from Buildstore to join CHARTEREDBRANDS, the brand revival specialists. ï Sadly, June also saw the untimely death of WWAV Rapp Collins Scotland’s managing director JOHN YOUNG, who lost his battle with cancer. He’ll be remembered for his energy and his love of his profession....

JUL

Despite it being the silly season, there was still plenty of news around – even if crazed protestors were tearing up half the country in the G8 riots. ï Graeme Atha kicked off the month by announcing he was joining agency FRAMEC, which then announced that it had lost its much-loved £5m Gala Bingo account. ï Euan Jarvie of Mediacom also revealed that his agency had picked up the £7m SUBWAY media brief. Low and behold if, a week after losing Gala Bingo, FrameC didn’t pick up the creative brief for the Subway brand. ï The big media story in The Drum was the almost inevitable takeover of SRH by EMAP. Speculation was suggesting early on that job cuts could be on the way – which has since proven to be the case. ï There were job cuts at Edinburgh-based design consultancy GRAPHIC PARTNERS, one of which was former Scottish Designer of the Year, Michael Fraser. ï It might have been a month before the football season, but 1576 was backing HEARTS, or rather Hearts was backing 1576, as it appointed the Edinburgh agency to work on brand development. ï The Drum’s columnist Victor Brierley left CITIGATE SMARTS after a strategic review by boss Mark Gorman. ï The Bridge won the Setanta advertising business, with PMPR winning the PR account. ï And The Scottish Executive tried to negotiate better rates with newspapers piling pressure on Scotland’s valuable but undervalued newspapers...

AUG

HARRISON COWLEY was ripped apart as joint managing directors David Southern and Malcolm Brown both announced their intentions to leave – with Southern joining Hearts FC and Brown moving to Scotmid. CEO Paul Kelly said he would be looking to find a repalcement (which he did within the year). ï There were also changes at below-the-line agency ARC as managing director Joe Mcaspurn and creative director Colin Brooks both left the agency after a tough time. ï Scotland’s newspapers decided to work together to attract readers and advertisers and appointed THE BRIDGE to create an advertising campaign to achieve that goal. ï The Drum, in association with Real Radio, launched its inaugural WAR OF THE WORDS competition to promote creativity in radio advertising. ï It was festival time in Edinburgh and The Drum jumped on the culture and arts bandwagon by hosting THE CHIP SHOP AWARDS as part of the festival itself. ï Ewan Colville of s1 moved to VISITSCOTLAND to take up an international marketing role, with former s1 senior brand manager, David Craik, appointed to take over. ï Former Barclaycard brand manager, Mike Hoban, was on the move as well this month as he joined SCOTTISH WIDOWS in Edinburgh, while Standard Life marketing bosses were reassuring THE LEITH AGENCY that it would be unaffected by the financial services company’s appointment of Saatchi & Saatchi to handle its de-mutualisation campaign. So far, it has been true to its word.....

SEP

As Hurricane Katrina dominated the daily news... Mike Kemsley quit BARKERS to launch his own start-up. The advertising director, who had been at Barkers for over six years, quit the agency to launch on his own. His resignation followed a series of high profile departures from Barkers. ï NABS announced the launch of a new committee in Scotland. ï Giles Etherington was named as creative director of TEN ALPS MTD following a half year search. ï The board at FEATHER BROOKSBANK was strengthened with the appointment of five new board directors (Gillian Cairney, Ann Gibb, Morgan Cox, Carol Irvine and Charlotte Bond). ï TENNENT’S LAGER launched its new ‘voodoo’ TV campaign through Newhaven set on location in Cuba. ï Towards the end of the month, TBWA\Edinburgh won the EDINBURGH ZOO creative pitch, the zoo’s first retained agency in five years. ï The Glasgow City Marketing Bureau finalised its £1.83m agency list for GLASGOW: SCOTLAND WITH STYLE, with incumbent advertising agency Maguire retaining its place along with four others. ï BD NTWK romped to victory in the eagerly contested Creative Cup Five a-sides competition. ï The most eagerly awaited newspaper relaunch happened in September when THE GUARDIAN moved to a Berliner Format....

OCT

Talented was making news in October, when it was acquired by UK marketing group Golley Slater, rebranding to GOLLEY SLATER NORTH. ï FRAMEC hired a trio of senior management, with former Wieden and Kennedy Amsterdam boss David Miller joining as MD. The agency also appointed Angus Walker from the Leith Agency as creative director and Scott Wylie, head of Scottish sales at Viacom, as client services director. A formidable team ï CITIGATE SMARTS, meanwhile, was sold by its parent network, The Huntsworth Group, to Media Square as part of a deal worth £63m. The agency was quick to play down any early fears that the deal was anything other than positive for the Scottish-based team. ï Advertising guru, JEREMY BULLMORE, came to Glasgow to address Glasgow Publicity Club members at its 80th anniversary celebrations. ï The biggest news in October was TBWA\EDINBURGH closing, citing ‘exceptionally tough’ conditions as the reason. ï It wasn’t all doom and gloom, though. Andy Jones took up a non-executive director role at Glasgow-based NATION1, 1576 acquired sponsorship and events firm Carnegie Worldwide and THE UNION appointed former Faulds’ board director John MacDougall, as account director. ï WWAV RAPP COLLINS brought in Jane Ulke to head up the office following the sad and untimely death of former agency MD John Young earlier in the year....

NOV

The Scottish Advertising Awards dominated the Scottish creative news at the start of November when NEWHAVEN won the most awards on the night. The agency was also crowned Advertising Agency on the Year, the first to beat The Leith Agency to the title in seven years. MEDIACOM won Media Agency of the Year for a second year. ï THE LEITH AGENCY, however, did win the Grand Prix Prize for BNJ. ï Special mention must also be made to JIM DOWNIE, who won the Lifetime Achievement Award having been at the forefront of the Scottish industry since 1970. ï Elsewhere, RADIO CLYDE continued with its changes following the Emap/SRH deal. Programme controller Ross McFadyen left the company after 15 years at Radio Clyde and David Goode, the group’s managing director announced that he too would depart at the end of the year, to be succeeded by Steve Parkinson. ï REAL RADIO celebrated another strong round of RAJAR results, putting Real as the largest commercial station in Scotland. ï WHYTE AND MACKAY recruited Richard Hayes, former European marketing director at Allied Domecq, as its new global marketing director, based in Glasgow. ï THE SUNDAY HERALD announced it would be following The Guardian by going ‘compact’. ï And, finally, in November, THE BRIDGE announced that it would be launching a new direct marketing division, Point Direct, to be headed up by Sandy McPherson....

DEC

December, traditionally a quiet month, saw a number of changes, appointments and reviews being announced. Firstly, TAYBURN was named as the agency to create the brand for Scotland’s bid to host the 2014 Commonwealth Games, with First Minister Jack McConnell being directly involved in the decision. ï New Edinburgh radio station TALK 107 - which launches in February 2006 - hired Citigate Smarts for its launch campaign ï The Leith Agency was hit by the news that CARLING was to review its multi-million pound advertising contract. A week later - although not directly linked - agency chairman, John Denholm, announced he was to quit the agency. ï It was also announced that Beat 106 was to be rebranded XFM SCOTLAND, and that Newhaven, Mediacom and EURO RSCG Biss Lancaster were to work on the rebranding brief. ï Elsewhere, following the departure of Malcolm Brown and David Southern in August, Jeremy Hamilton was appointed as the director of HARRISON COWLEY, joining from First Milk, where he was head of communications. ï One of the more controversial pieces of legislation was passed by the Scottish Parliament, to ban smoking in public places. In December, THE LEITH AGENCY launched the first adverts for the ban, which comes into effect next year ï And CONTAGIOUS won the top honours in The Drum’s 2005 Annual Report Review for The National Trust for Scotland, beating off competition from 26 other entries....

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