Muscular Dystrophy UK: Walk the Last Bit to Work by Atomic London

Date: Jun 2020
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Muscular Dystrophy UK has teamed up with creative agency Atomic London to create an innovative new campaign to raise £1m towards lost income.

The charity, which leads the fight against 60 rare and very rare muscle-wasting conditions that affect more than 70,000 people in the UK, is encouraging Londoners to stay away from packed tubes during Covid-19 and join Carmela in a virtual walk to work by donating their £3 tube fare. The campaign will feature across outdoor, digital and social media.

Carmela Chillery-Watson, a determined and engaging six-year-old from Devizes, has been in complete lockdown – called shielding – since March and cannot leave her house. Carmela was diagnosed three years ago with a very rare congenital muscular dystrophy and has gone on to raise thousands of pounds for Muscular Dystrophy UK. But her condition means that even when lockdown eases and people begin to return to work or school, Carmela and many thousands like her will continue to stay shielded at home for many more months.

The campaign will see Carmela turned in to a digital 8-bit version of herself, walking through an 8-bit Pixel Art map of London, created by the digital artists Eboy and featured on the iconic Piccadilly Lights billboard. Londoners will be invited to ‘walk with her’ by walking the last mile to work and donating their £3 tube fare via text. In return for each donation, a digital person will be added to the billboard alongside Carmela in an attempt to raise an unprecedented £1m for the charity.

Credits

Executive Creative Directors: Guy Bradbury & Dave Henderson

Head of Planning: Steve Hopkins

Creative Director Art & Design: Pete Mould

Creative: Ben Gough, Amilcar Torija

Senior Account Manager: Catherine Martyn

Senior Project Manager: Charlie Berry

Motion Graphics: Richard Green, Max Sizeland

Illustrator: Eboy

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