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It's social media, minus the irritating hashtags. Iona St Joseph cuts through the clutter to bring you a weekly update on the social stories you need to know. ...

...A trained journalist, Iona manages the social team at 10 Yetis' dedicated division, A Social Media Agency. You can follow her daily musings and opinions on Twitter @ionastjoseph.

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12 June 2013 - 12:38pm | posted by | 4 comments

Prism: Why only the guilty and the kinky actually care

The Metro upset social media users with its Game of Thrones spoilersThe Metro upset social media users with its Game of Thrones spoilers

In the first of a new weekly column, A Social Media Agency's Iona St Joseph takes a look at what people have been talking about on social media over the last week, starting with fears about Prism, complaints about Game of Thrones and grumblings about the new tech from Apple and Microsoft. Who knew social media users did so much moaning?

The people of the internet were up in arms this week, after news that the US government’s Prism internet surveillance programme was apparently spying on everyone’s Facebook and Gmail accounts. The New York Times quickly disbanded the rumours, saying that nothing revealed suggests that the NSA were targeting ordinary Americans, so we (apparently) don’t have anything to worry about… yet.

But what happens if (when) they start monitoring everyone’s social media and email activity? I’m not going to be devastated that the government can easily find out that I once ate 10 bags of Space Raiders in one day (true story), just by looking at my Facebook page.

Sure, I’ll probably just double check that what I’m posting online isn’t going to end up with my family being dragged out of bed in the middle of the night for interrogation, but to be honest, I usually think twice about posting anything remotely controversial anyway.

So why is everyone so concerned about having their posts and emails viewed? Well, they’re not really. The only people that don’t want the government viewing what they’re doing is the 1 per cent that are up to some sort of online criminal activity.

The remaining 99 per cent that don’t want everyone at GCHQ checking out their Facebook profile are the ones who don’t want the authorities lol’ing at the naked pictures they send to their partner whilst they’re at work. C’mon, you know it’s true…

Game of Thrones: SPOILERS ALERT

In case you STILL don’t know what happened in THAT episode, don’t click through to any of the links in this post. Just in case.

The internet practically imploded last week after a particularly exciting episode of Game of Thrones, but meltdown 2.0 came when someone (*cough* The Metro *cough*) published some serious plot spoilers. Now, surely, getting annoyed at the internet for ruining a plot line is like getting annoyed about British summertime being rainy and crap. We all know it’s going to happen, and we complain about it continuously, but we keep going back for more.

The Metro were at the forefront of a lot of GoT related abuse, mainly due to the fact that they wrote up a spoiler-tastic article about it. Needless to say, fans watching on catch up were not best pleased.

So should they have written it up so quickly? According to Twitter, the answer was a resounding ‘NO WAY OMG I CAN’T BELIEVE YOU’D DO THAT’, but, to everyone else, covering a story about a TV show that has already aired is pretty kosher.

Just a bit of advice for the future; maybe avoid reading an article about something you haven’t watched yet and want to avoid finding out what happened.

iOS 7: The iPhone’s fancy new look

Apple unveiled its brand spanking new operating system on Tuesday, iOS7. The new operating system is, essentially, Apple’s desperate attempt to catch up with Samsung and its swanky new S4.

Apart from a few tweaks, not a lot has changed in terms of the iPhone’s interface since the original iPhone was released. We all remember waiting for a huge update when we though the iPhone 5 was going to be release, but it turned out to be the 4S… and all we got was Siri, which was cool for a while, but everyone’s bored of it now. There’s only so many times asking a phone where you can hide a dead body, and it offering up a list of swamps, dumps and reservoirs, is funny.

Xbox vs PlayStation: IT’S ON

Much of the conversation on social media this week has centred around the fact that both Microsoft and Sony are both releasing their latest version of their consoles, the Xbox One and the PlayStation 4.

So which is best, how will you choose?! Let’s be honest: you’ve already picked one. I think it’s pretty safe to say that if you’ve got an Xbox, you’re going to go for the Xbox One. If you’ve got a Playstation, then you’re going to go for… you guessed it! The PS4. There is, however, an exception to this rule.

Unless you’re willing to fork out the best part of £500 for a console that won’t even let you play any of your old games, or share your games with your friends, then you’re probably going to stick with the console you’ve already got. Which sounds like a very sensible idea.

You can follow Iona's daily musings and opinions on Twitter @ionastjoseph

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Comments

12 Jun 2013 - 14:18
alexjuddz11970

When it comes to the Game of Thrones spoiler: I've heard the advice of "don't read the article" before - but when it's splashed on page 3 without a heads up, it's a pretty poor show.

Luckily, I'd watched it already - but I think it was a bit of a shameless stunt by the paper. Yes it's only a TV show, but it would have spoiled the hour long episode for any commuter that didn't have the chance to watch it that night.

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12 Jun 2013 - 14:23
matth21182's picture

Complete and utter drivel.

At least try and comprehend, outside of your own existence, why mass-government surveillance is a bad idea.

The US government will have a turn-key Totalatarian state, they are most probably monitoring and intercepting foreign research and development to pass to US companies (as they have in the past) thus reducing international competition and unfairly gaining advantages.

It equips the government to blackmail every citizen or corporation. It can blackmail citizens to make sure people fall in to line or remain quiet on uncovered abuses of power, political scandals and can pass on (real or fabricated) information to third parties that are connected to the government.

The US history is littered with unethical abuses of power, this is giving them the complete means to blackmail and threaten all individuals. It gives the means to cover up political lies, scandals and abuses of power.

What happens if this database is hacked and leaked? If a 3rd party manages it, they could sell this information on to selected companies. What happens if data is erroneously collected?

There are so many things wrong with this, this is just the tip of the iceberg. It isn't a case of if you have done nothing wrong you have nothing to fear, rather, that with this information that is being collected, should we not fear immense power the government wields? Do we believe politicians have a strong enough moral compass not to abuse this power?

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12 Jun 2013 - 14:39
andybarr's picture

I think it i clear for all to see, MattH is one of the kinky or guilty ones :-) LOL

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12 Jun 2013 - 20:15
dmmil12480's picture

Not so sure that people have made their minds up on Sony vs Microsoft.

Lots of people are massively upset by the "controlling" practices of Microsoft.

Might Sony's short term thinking be bad for them and us in the long run?

http://wjminnovate.wordpress.com/2013/06/11/xbox-one-and-playstation-4-g...

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