Ad of the Day: Israeli food truck serves up ‘women's meat’ sandwiches to highlight prostitutes’ vulnerability

The food truck’s menu includes ‘Breast Amal’ and ‘Ribs of Yael’

A food truck selling ‘women’s meat’ sandwiches has been parked outside the Israeli Parliament this month, as part of a campaign calling on politicians in the state to criminalise prostitution.

The Task Force on Human Trafficking and Prostitution (TFHT) partnered with M&C Saatchi Tel Aviv to devise the experiential 'Meet the Meat' creative. The food truck’s menu includes ‘Breast Amal’ and ‘Ribs of Yael’ – Amal and Yael being popular Israeli women's names.

Those that order the fictitious meats are presented with a sandwich in a brown paper bag, upon which real life stories of women engaged in prostitution are written. The truck features an illustration of a woman’s body divided into ‘cuts’, much like that of a butcher’s cow.

Mortality rates among Israeli female prostitutes are 40 times higher than the rest of the population. The TFHT is campaigning for the criminalisation of prostitution in a country where it’s illegal to advertise, pimp or engage in prostitution services from minors, but legal to purchase sex from adults.

The campaign aims to reduce the demand for prostitution by engaging with consumers who finance the industry, with or without understanding its implications.

Tzur Golan, executive creative director and partner at M&C Saatchi Tel Aviv, said: “We can’t stand by and let this continue. It’s important to highlight the fact that every day vulnerable men, women and teenagers are employed in prostitution – and it’s getting worse.

“The best way to stop the wheels of this industry is to harm demand – if there's no demand there won't be supply. We wanted to create meaningful work and will continue to support TFHT as they continue to take a stand against the prostitution industry."

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Katie Deighton

Katie Deighton is The Drum’s senior reporter - creative and video based in London. She produces, films, presents and edits the title’s editorial video output, including series such as On The Scene, Ad Breakers and Why I Left Advertising, and manages its coverage of the creative sector. She also reports on the intersection between politics and marketing, as well as the third sector and fashion.

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